Quick wickets wobble England

Burnley and Pendle Citizen: Alastair Cook won the toss and elected to bat after England named an unchanged line-up for the second one-day international Alastair Cook won the toss and elected to bat after England named an unchanged line-up for the second one-day international

England lost three quick wickets after a half-century opening stand between Alastair Cook and Ian Bell in the second one-day international against Australia in Brisbane.

After Cook won the toss and elected to bat, on a Gabba pitch that looked tailor-made for runscoring, an unchanged England were 90 for three after 20 overs.

Cook added 57 with Bell before the skipper and out-of-sorts Joe Root fell in successive overs.

Gary Ballance was then stumped charging at spinner Glenn Maxwell as England lost three wickets for 21 runs in 36 balls.

Bell was unbeaten on 45 and while he survived some nervous moments, twice inside edging past his stumps, he was starting to settle after a jumpy start alongside Eoin Morgan.

Cook had seen off the new-ball threat of Mitchell Johnson, back in Australia's side after being rested for the series-opener, only to fall victim to the first ball of spin he faced.

The left-hander pushed back a low return catch that Maxwell held well.

Root then came and went as he played horribly around a Johnson delivery that thudded into his back thigh.

The Yorkshireman incorrectly reviewed the decision, for the second successive match, with replays showing the ball would have flicked the bails.

Ballance managed nine before he ran past a Maxwell delivery and Brad Haddin awkwardly completed the glovework to see him short of his ground.

It could have been worse for England when Morgan survived a run out chance at the non-striker's end when he was on just one.

Michael Clarke intelligently deflected a Bell drive that just missed the stumps, with a diving Morgan short of his ground.

Clarke thought he had Morgan next ball, caught at deep midwicket, but the left-hander had spotted too many fielders outside the ring and a no-ball was called.

After winning the toss, Cook immediately put himself in the firing line, after failing to survive the opening over in his past two matches.

A single from Clint McKay's first ball ensured he was able to watch the rest of the over from the safety of the non striker's end.

Johnson immediately tested him in his first over, fizzing past Cook's probing bat, but the skipper flicked him to the square leg rope to get going.

Bell made a skittish start, but showed signs of intent as he lofted into the outfield when given room.

A return of 52 runs from the 10-over powerplay was good value for England's start, but the openers' work was undone by the three quick wickets.

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