Parking charge increase on the way to Burnley

NEW parking charges are set to be introduced in Burnley town centre — with motorists paying short visits bearing the brunt.

Short-stay car parks will see the one-hour and under fee rise from 80p to 90p, and the one to two hour charge increase from £1.40 to £1.50.

And parking for more than three hours will attract a charge of £5.50, instead of £5.00.

But the two to three hours banding, for £2, will remain the same.

Coun Mark Townsend, resources cabinet member for the Labour-controlled authority, said at a recent council meeting that the move was designed to stimulate footfall in the high street.

“We have been trying to get people to stay longer in the town centre so we have tried to spread the cost out,” he said.

But opposition Liberal Democrats claimed that freezing the car parking charges com-pletely was a better stimulus to encourage shoppers into Burnley.

Deputy leader Coun Margaret Lishman said that the administration had already left a ‘trail of broken promises’ with its spending plans.

Single visits to the Finsley Gate No. 2 and Centenary Way car parks will increase from £3.50 to £3.70.

Park users will also be hit by the shake-up.

The Towneley Hall, Riverside and Barwise car parks are currently chargeable between 10am and 5pm.

But the hours have been altered so it is now 8am to 10pm.

All of the new car parking charges will come into force in Burnley from Friday, February 1.

Comments (17)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

4:34pm Mon 28 Jan 13

carrman2 says...

Is it any wonder people are leaving the area, Even in the local parks , And the shopkeepers in town will suffer ,
Is it any wonder people are leaving the area, Even in the local parks , And the shopkeepers in town will suffer , carrman2
  • Score: 0

4:43pm Mon 28 Jan 13

Rose Rouge says...

There were supposed to be 'free parking Saturdays' in Burnley to try and encourage shoppers, but the whole thing was so badly promoted at the start, and seems to have gone totally quiet now.
There were supposed to be 'free parking Saturdays' in Burnley to try and encourage shoppers, but the whole thing was so badly promoted at the start, and seems to have gone totally quiet now. Rose Rouge
  • Score: 0

4:58pm Mon 28 Jan 13

hi everyone says...

this is why we go to accrington parking is free,the shops are nice what is left in burnley,nail shops,cafes and take aways
this is why we go to accrington parking is free,the shops are nice what is left in burnley,nail shops,cafes and take aways hi everyone
  • Score: 0

5:33pm Mon 28 Jan 13

burner says...

, , , " resources cabinet member for the Labour-controlled authority, said at a recent council meeting that the move was designed to stimulate footfall in the high street. " . . . . if he REALLY said that, he meant to say the opposite, surely.
.
I have heard some foolish things said in my lifetime !!!! but that . . . . . !!! He really said that if you charge people more for a service they can obtain for FREE in some places, then more people will want to pay for that service ????????????????????
??????????????????? Beyond belief !!!
, , , " resources cabinet member for the Labour-controlled authority, said at a recent council meeting that the move was designed to stimulate footfall in the high street. " . . . . if he REALLY said that, he meant to say the opposite, surely. . I have heard some foolish things said in my lifetime !!!! but that . . . . . !!! He really said that if you charge people more for a service they can obtain for FREE in some places, then more people will want to pay for that service ???????????????????? ??????????????????? Beyond belief !!! burner
  • Score: 0

6:52pm Mon 28 Jan 13

Interocitor says...

One way to increase footfall would be to make the first hour free like some of our neighbouring towns. Increasing the cost of parking will only drive (no pun intended) more people away. Fewer people = fewer shops and this hits both local employment and the business rates.
One way to increase footfall would be to make the first hour free like some of our neighbouring towns. Increasing the cost of parking will only drive (no pun intended) more people away. Fewer people = fewer shops and this hits both local employment and the business rates. Interocitor
  • Score: 0

7:08pm Mon 28 Jan 13

2 for 5p says...

Tell you what I'll keep going to out of town shopping centres and supermarkets.
Free parking and lots of it, no tramps or beggers, no traffic jams, no charity shops, cheaper prices,
I don't see any point going to the high street anymore especially if you have to pay for the pleasure.
Tell you what I'll keep going to out of town shopping centres and supermarkets. Free parking and lots of it, no tramps or beggers, no traffic jams, no charity shops, cheaper prices, I don't see any point going to the high street anymore especially if you have to pay for the pleasure. 2 for 5p
  • Score: 0

7:17pm Mon 28 Jan 13

burner says...

Good to see we have got several months notice . . . or NOT !!
Good to see we have got several months notice . . . or NOT !! burner
  • Score: 0

8:18pm Mon 28 Jan 13

rggraham1947 says...

"Coun Mark Townsend, resources cabinet member for the Labour-controlled authority, said at a recent council meeting that the move was designed to stimulate footfall in the high street." - typiical Labour perverted logic!
"Coun Mark Townsend, resources cabinet member for the Labour-controlled authority, said at a recent council meeting that the move was designed to stimulate footfall in the high street." - typiical Labour perverted logic! rggraham1947
  • Score: 0

10:16pm Mon 28 Jan 13

psch says...

Not got a clue, another nail in the coffin of town centre shopping. Footfall doesn't increase with less customers and footfall does not mean a sale. Those only going for an hour have somewhere to go and probably putting their hand in their pocket. If they make the first hour free then more money in the shops.
Not got a clue, another nail in the coffin of town centre shopping. Footfall doesn't increase with less customers and footfall does not mean a sale. Those only going for an hour have somewhere to go and probably putting their hand in their pocket. If they make the first hour free then more money in the shops. psch
  • Score: 0

12:28am Tue 29 Jan 13

retsofad says...

Another nail in the coffin of Burnley
other council are trying to put up charges. charging the disabled to park on their town carparks, disabled drivers have a blue badge with 3 hrs free parking but only on DD yellow lines causing traffic congestion thats why councils have to provide 6% of spaces for disabled drivers remember that a disabled person takes longer to get round doing their shoping than an abled bodied person it's time ALL drivers hit back at these outrages prices and refused to pay.
Another nail in the coffin of Burnley other council are trying to put up charges. charging the disabled to park on their town carparks, disabled drivers have a blue badge with 3 hrs free parking but only on DD yellow lines causing traffic congestion thats why councils have to provide 6% of spaces for disabled drivers remember that a disabled person takes longer to get round doing their shoping than an abled bodied person it's time ALL drivers hit back at these outrages prices and refused to pay. retsofad
  • Score: 0

7:34am Tue 29 Jan 13

midas says...

what, another 10p to park!!! That's it I'm going to drive an extra half hour to Accrington, it's free to park there! Doh!
what, another 10p to park!!! That's it I'm going to drive an extra half hour to Accrington, it's free to park there! Doh! midas
  • Score: 0

8:34am Tue 29 Jan 13

Kevin, Colne says...

The travails of the High Street have been well documented and the forces at work are exceedingly strong.

For local government the future is looking extremely difficult and they are attempting to exploit every source of short-term revenue available to them; even if that weakens other aspects of the locality. Increasing car parking charges is an obvious target.

It’s a great shame that as a country we largely squandered our inheritance of North Sea oil and sold off the family silver in the way that we did – our utilities.

Have we learned nothing from the board game ‘Monopoly’ that was designed to get the message across that ownership of assets – who the landlords are – really matters?

The public utilities had been carefully built and nurtured by our forefathers in local government and they were immensely proud of what they had achieved – and justly so.

If we had converted them to quasi public-private enterprises recognising their strategic importance with the state owning a golden share preventing them from falling into foreign ownership then municipalities could still have had a stake in them.

Local councils would be enjoying a valuable dividend income that would be growing in real terms; and this source of revenue would be independent from central government.

In places like Burnley right now that money could be put to very good use.

Moreover local authorities collectively would be significant shareholders and could vote en bloc to temper the worst excesses of corporate, managerial behaviour.

I know that I have daft ideas, and this ranks as one of the daftest, probably and I'm not too sure how we could get from where we are now to the situation I describe above.

From where I'm sitting the mainstream political parties give every impression of being stuck in a rut and in thrall to ideas from ‘think tanks’ that have agendas other than the well-being of the citizenry.
The travails of the High Street have been well documented and the forces at work are exceedingly strong. For local government the future is looking extremely difficult and they are attempting to exploit every source of short-term revenue available to them; even if that weakens other aspects of the locality. Increasing car parking charges is an obvious target. It’s a great shame that as a country we largely squandered our inheritance of North Sea oil and sold off the family silver in the way that we did – our utilities. Have we learned nothing from the board game ‘Monopoly’ that was designed to get the message across that ownership of assets – who the landlords are – really matters? The public utilities had been carefully built and nurtured by our forefathers in local government and they were immensely proud of what they had achieved – and justly so. If we had converted them to quasi public-private enterprises recognising their strategic importance with the state owning a golden share preventing them from falling into foreign ownership then municipalities could still have had a stake in them. Local councils would be enjoying a valuable dividend income that would be growing in real terms; and this source of revenue would be independent from central government. In places like Burnley right now that money could be put to very good use. Moreover local authorities collectively would be significant shareholders and could vote en bloc to temper the worst excesses of corporate, managerial behaviour. I know that I have daft ideas, and this ranks as one of the daftest, probably and I'm not too sure how we could get from where we are now to the situation I describe above. From where I'm sitting the mainstream political parties give every impression of being stuck in a rut and in thrall to ideas from ‘think tanks’ that have agendas other than the well-being of the citizenry. Kevin, Colne
  • Score: 0

8:59am Tue 29 Jan 13

rggraham1947 says...

Kevin, Colne wrote:
The travails of the High Street have been well documented and the forces at work are exceedingly strong. For local government the future is looking extremely difficult and they are attempting to exploit every source of short-term revenue available to them; even if that weakens other aspects of the locality. Increasing car parking charges is an obvious target. It’s a great shame that as a country we largely squandered our inheritance of North Sea oil and sold off the family silver in the way that we did – our utilities. Have we learned nothing from the board game ‘Monopoly’ that was designed to get the message across that ownership of assets – who the landlords are – really matters? The public utilities had been carefully built and nurtured by our forefathers in local government and they were immensely proud of what they had achieved – and justly so. If we had converted them to quasi public-private enterprises recognising their strategic importance with the state owning a golden share preventing them from falling into foreign ownership then municipalities could still have had a stake in them. Local councils would be enjoying a valuable dividend income that would be growing in real terms; and this source of revenue would be independent from central government. In places like Burnley right now that money could be put to very good use. Moreover local authorities collectively would be significant shareholders and could vote en bloc to temper the worst excesses of corporate, managerial behaviour. I know that I have daft ideas, and this ranks as one of the daftest, probably and I'm not too sure how we could get from where we are now to the situation I describe above. From where I'm sitting the mainstream political parties give every impression of being stuck in a rut and in thrall to ideas from ‘think tanks’ that have agendas other than the well-being of the citizenry.
Some sense here but you're fighting yesterday's battles. You can't turn back the clock; you have to start from where we are now.
[quote][p][bold]Kevin, Colne[/bold] wrote: The travails of the High Street have been well documented and the forces at work are exceedingly strong. For local government the future is looking extremely difficult and they are attempting to exploit every source of short-term revenue available to them; even if that weakens other aspects of the locality. Increasing car parking charges is an obvious target. It’s a great shame that as a country we largely squandered our inheritance of North Sea oil and sold off the family silver in the way that we did – our utilities. Have we learned nothing from the board game ‘Monopoly’ that was designed to get the message across that ownership of assets – who the landlords are – really matters? The public utilities had been carefully built and nurtured by our forefathers in local government and they were immensely proud of what they had achieved – and justly so. If we had converted them to quasi public-private enterprises recognising their strategic importance with the state owning a golden share preventing them from falling into foreign ownership then municipalities could still have had a stake in them. Local councils would be enjoying a valuable dividend income that would be growing in real terms; and this source of revenue would be independent from central government. In places like Burnley right now that money could be put to very good use. Moreover local authorities collectively would be significant shareholders and could vote en bloc to temper the worst excesses of corporate, managerial behaviour. I know that I have daft ideas, and this ranks as one of the daftest, probably and I'm not too sure how we could get from where we are now to the situation I describe above. From where I'm sitting the mainstream political parties give every impression of being stuck in a rut and in thrall to ideas from ‘think tanks’ that have agendas other than the well-being of the citizenry.[/p][/quote]Some sense here but you're fighting yesterday's battles. You can't turn back the clock; you have to start from where we are now. rggraham1947
  • Score: 0

1:11pm Tue 29 Jan 13

hasslem hasslem says...

midas wrote:
what, another 10p to park!!! That's it I'm going to drive an extra half hour to Accrington, it's free to park there! Doh!
or stop going to burnley tc altogether and just visit the out-of-town retail stores and shop there on free, flat, easy access, non urine polluted car parks.

councils continue to implement the death of a thousand cuts on town centre traders.
[quote][p][bold]midas[/bold] wrote: what, another 10p to park!!! That's it I'm going to drive an extra half hour to Accrington, it's free to park there! Doh![/p][/quote]or stop going to burnley tc altogether and just visit the out-of-town retail stores and shop there on free, flat, easy access, non urine polluted car parks. councils continue to implement the death of a thousand cuts on town centre traders. hasslem hasslem
  • Score: 0

1:46pm Tue 29 Jan 13

midas says...

but their not free! you have to drive there and therefore spend more on petrol rather than paying money to the Council which in turn reduces the amount needed to be paid in council tax.
.
If you cannot afford to pay £2 for car parking than you aren't really going to be spending lots of money in the shops!
but their not free! you have to drive there and therefore spend more on petrol rather than paying money to the Council which in turn reduces the amount needed to be paid in council tax. . If you cannot afford to pay £2 for car parking than you aren't really going to be spending lots of money in the shops! midas
  • Score: 0

4:01pm Tue 29 Jan 13

rggraham1947 says...

midas wrote:
but their not free! you have to drive there and therefore spend more on petrol rather than paying money to the Council which in turn reduces the amount needed to be paid in council tax. . If you cannot afford to pay £2 for car parking than you aren't really going to be spending lots of money in the shops!
If you think parking charges are going towards reducing your council tax you're totally naive; it goes towards keeping "equality and inclusion" departments going and implementing their pet schemes. £2 for car parking is £2 less spent in shops and £2 more into the grasping maw of bureaucracy.
[quote][p][bold]midas[/bold] wrote: but their not free! you have to drive there and therefore spend more on petrol rather than paying money to the Council which in turn reduces the amount needed to be paid in council tax. . If you cannot afford to pay £2 for car parking than you aren't really going to be spending lots of money in the shops![/p][/quote]If you think parking charges are going towards reducing your council tax you're totally naive; it goes towards keeping "equality and inclusion" departments going and implementing their pet schemes. £2 for car parking is £2 less spent in shops and £2 more into the grasping maw of bureaucracy. rggraham1947
  • Score: 0

9:29am Wed 30 Jan 13

midas says...

rggraham1947 wrote:
midas wrote: but their not free! you have to drive there and therefore spend more on petrol rather than paying money to the Council which in turn reduces the amount needed to be paid in council tax. . If you cannot afford to pay £2 for car parking than you aren't really going to be spending lots of money in the shops!
If you think parking charges are going towards reducing your council tax you're totally naive; it goes towards keeping "equality and inclusion" departments going and implementing their pet schemes. £2 for car parking is £2 less spent in shops and £2 more into the grasping maw of bureaucracy.
Yes of course it does, meanwhile in the adult world we might have someone who can produce some evidence that shows a correlation between car park charges, footfall and spend in shops.
[quote][p][bold]rggraham1947[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]midas[/bold] wrote: but their not free! you have to drive there and therefore spend more on petrol rather than paying money to the Council which in turn reduces the amount needed to be paid in council tax. . If you cannot afford to pay £2 for car parking than you aren't really going to be spending lots of money in the shops![/p][/quote]If you think parking charges are going towards reducing your council tax you're totally naive; it goes towards keeping "equality and inclusion" departments going and implementing their pet schemes. £2 for car parking is £2 less spent in shops and £2 more into the grasping maw of bureaucracy.[/p][/quote]Yes of course it does, meanwhile in the adult world we might have someone who can produce some evidence that shows a correlation between car park charges, footfall and spend in shops. midas
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree