Former Burnley Council leader is 'proud' of her record

Burnley and Pendle Citizen: Julie Cooper Julie Cooper

LABOUR has served notice on Burnley MP Gordon Birtwistle that the fight for his Parliamentary seat could go right down to the wire.

Borough elections have seen the party make two gains from the Liberal Democrats, just 12 months ahead of the General Election.

But Lib Dems say it is still early days as they marshall their efforts to defending Mr Birtwistle’s 1,818 majority next time around.

Council leader Coun Julie Cooper was impressed with Labour victories in Queensgate and Lanehead after Lib Dem councillor Jennifer Knowles stood down and veteran Peter McCann retired.

“We have been working hard in both wards and we have got two good councillors who have reaped the rewards. It has been a great team effort,” she said.

And as the Bank Hall councillor steps down to concentrate her efforts on her Westminster candidacy, she says she is ‘proud’ of her record as leader.

“When I first became leader we had 12 Labour councillors and now as I step down we have 28 councillors. I’m very proud of that record and having led this campaign,” she added.

Lib Dem group leader Coun Margaret Lishman said that Labour had failed to secure two seats - Rosehill with Burnley Wood and Gannow - which they had been ‘desperate’ to win.

Coun Jeff Sumner beat Labour’s Michael Rushton by 970 to 541 votes in a head-to-head contest in Burnley Wood and Coun Neil Mottershead was re-elected with a 196-vote majority in Gannow.

Coun Lishman said: “I think there is a long time until next year and will be working hard in the meantime. We have to respond to what people are telling us and we will see how we fare.”

Burnley MP Gordon Birtwistle, who held onto his own Coalclough with Deerplay seat at the election, said: “We expected to do a lot worse than we did - we got 37 per cent of the vote, which was only half a per cent from what we had in 2010. Labour is around six or seven per cent ahead.

“We knew we were probably going to lose in Queensgate and Lanehead but Labour threw the kitchen sink at Jeff Sumner in Rosehill with Burnley Wood and he won comfortably.

“We are a lot more confident about what will happen at a General Election than we were. There are lessons to be learned. People think we are doing a good job with the economy and we need to work harder to tell people just what we are achieving.”

No seats were secured by UKIP in the Burnley polls - unlike elsewhere in the north-west - but they did manage to ensure four second-place finishes.

The closest Nigel Farage’s troops came was in Whittlefield-with-Ightenhill, which was held by Lib Dem Tom Porter, who was only 99 votes ahead of UKIP’s Christopher Rawson.

But also in Brunshaw ward, which was held by Tony Harrison for Labour, UKIP’s Jamie McGowan was only 121 behind on 500 votes, pushing ahead of Lib Dem Susan Fenn on 231.

Coun Cooper said the UKIP vote had been ‘significant’ and she would be listening to people’s concerns between now and next May to build trust in Labour.

Coun Lishman said the ‘protest vote’ registered by UKIP was similar to that which saw the BNP make gains a decade ago - but no seats had been secured.

Commenting on the UKIP vote, Mr Birtwistle said: “They did very well but they have not won a seat. I have been on the council for a long time and I recall when we used to secure lots of votes and not win any seats, and we used to complain about the ‘first past the post’ system. They are now in that position.”

The polls also saw former mayor Coun Jean Cunningham hold Hapton with Park, for Labour, by 199 votes, and outgoing mayor Coun Frank Cant triumphed convincingly in Gawthorpe ward.

Comments (27)

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7:33pm Sat 24 May 14

DaveBurnley says...

Cheer all you like Julie, most of us won't forget the treachery of Kitty Usher, our ex MP, who helped get rid of our A & E together with a lot of our sub post offices.


Try to blame LIb Dems all you like, you can't fool all the people, all the time.
Cheer all you like Julie, most of us won't forget the treachery of Kitty Usher, our ex MP, who helped get rid of our A & E together with a lot of our sub post offices. Try to blame LIb Dems all you like, you can't fool all the people, all the time. DaveBurnley
  • Score: 17

8:41pm Sat 24 May 14

2 for 5p ridesagain says...

What a disgraceful headline

Former Burnley Council leader is 'proud' of her record

Pride is one of the seven deadly sins.
What a disgraceful headline Former Burnley Council leader is 'proud' of her record Pride is one of the seven deadly sins. 2 for 5p ridesagain
  • Score: -5

9:58pm Sat 24 May 14

zabby says...

Proud,do they see a different burnley to me,nothing to be proud of here apart from the clarets,which has nothing to do with the Labour Party
Proud,do they see a different burnley to me,nothing to be proud of here apart from the clarets,which has nothing to do with the Labour Party zabby
  • Score: 11

11:27pm Sat 24 May 14

Shane says...

Off subject I know but I wonder what that lad who get a slap from David Moyes was treated in hospital for, a limp wrist?
Off subject I know but I wonder what that lad who get a slap from David Moyes was treated in hospital for, a limp wrist? Shane
  • Score: 4

12:18am Sun 25 May 14

Steven11 says...

Shane wrote:
Off subject I know but I wonder what that lad who get a slap from David Moyes was treated in hospital for, a limp wrist?
No , more like a limp brain. !
[quote][p][bold]Shane[/bold] wrote: Off subject I know but I wonder what that lad who get a slap from David Moyes was treated in hospital for, a limp wrist?[/p][/quote]No , more like a limp brain. ! Steven11
  • Score: 6

8:53am Sun 25 May 14

gazzandste says...

Steven11 wrote:
Shane wrote:
Off subject I know but I wonder what that lad who get a slap from David Moyes was treated in hospital for, a limp wrist?
No , more like a limp brain. !
Publicity and a claim comes to mind. Moyes didn't hit him hard enough, the little scrote.
[quote][p][bold]Steven11[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Shane[/bold] wrote: Off subject I know but I wonder what that lad who get a slap from David Moyes was treated in hospital for, a limp wrist?[/p][/quote]No , more like a limp brain. ![/p][/quote]Publicity and a claim comes to mind. Moyes didn't hit him hard enough, the little scrote. gazzandste
  • Score: 4

9:32am Sun 25 May 14

timeforcommonsense says...

I have been astounded by the sheer stupidity of people in the North West. What tiny memories people have. Why the hell would anyone want labour in charge? It's like handing the wheel of a crashed car back over to the drunk driver who smashed it up. This country is having to make huge cuts BECAUSE of LABOUR, who handed the country over to the Conservatives with NO MONEY left in the pot. Does anybody really think that this party is the working man party for the working men? They are all chinless public school boys who are far removed from the real world.
I have been astounded by the sheer stupidity of people in the North West. What tiny memories people have. Why the hell would anyone want labour in charge? It's like handing the wheel of a crashed car back over to the drunk driver who smashed it up. This country is having to make huge cuts BECAUSE of LABOUR, who handed the country over to the Conservatives with NO MONEY left in the pot. Does anybody really think that this party is the working man party for the working men? They are all chinless public school boys who are far removed from the real world. timeforcommonsense
  • Score: 4

10:53am Sun 25 May 14

Excluded again says...

timeforcommonsense wrote:
I have been astounded by the sheer stupidity of people in the North West. What tiny memories people have. Why the hell would anyone want labour in charge? It's like handing the wheel of a crashed car back over to the drunk driver who smashed it up. This country is having to make huge cuts BECAUSE of LABOUR, who handed the country over to the Conservatives with NO MONEY left in the pot. Does anybody really think that this party is the working man party for the working men? They are all chinless public school boys who are far removed from the real world.
No, the country is in a mess because of the worldwide financial crash in 2007-08. Which meant governments all over the world had to pump hundreds of billions into the banks to prevent the world economy collapsing.

It didn't matter whether governments were from the centre, the left or the right They all had to pump in billions of dollars, euros, pounds or any other currency going, Britain's share was an eye-watering £800 billion. And that is why there was no money left.

PS on a purely factual point, all of the people holding the top five jobs in the Labour Party (Leader, Deputy Leader. Shadow Chancellor, Home Secretary and Foreign Secretary) went to state schools.
[quote][p][bold]timeforcommonsense[/bold] wrote: I have been astounded by the sheer stupidity of people in the North West. What tiny memories people have. Why the hell would anyone want labour in charge? It's like handing the wheel of a crashed car back over to the drunk driver who smashed it up. This country is having to make huge cuts BECAUSE of LABOUR, who handed the country over to the Conservatives with NO MONEY left in the pot. Does anybody really think that this party is the working man party for the working men? They are all chinless public school boys who are far removed from the real world.[/p][/quote]No, the country is in a mess because of the worldwide financial crash in 2007-08. Which meant governments all over the world had to pump hundreds of billions into the banks to prevent the world economy collapsing. It didn't matter whether governments were from the centre, the left or the right They all had to pump in billions of dollars, euros, pounds or any other currency going, Britain's share was an eye-watering £800 billion. And that is why there was no money left. PS on a purely factual point, all of the people holding the top five jobs in the Labour Party (Leader, Deputy Leader. Shadow Chancellor, Home Secretary and Foreign Secretary) went to state schools. Excluded again
  • Score: 8

11:08am Sun 25 May 14

timeforcommonsense says...

Who allowed the banks the freedom to stuff up the economy? It happens every time with Labour. They get in, stuff up the country and then hand a pile of crap to who ever takes over. Regardless of where these people are educated they are all massively out of touch with what is going on in this country and all too interested with making sure they are well off.
Who allowed the banks the freedom to stuff up the economy? It happens every time with Labour. They get in, stuff up the country and then hand a pile of crap to who ever takes over. Regardless of where these people are educated they are all massively out of touch with what is going on in this country and all too interested with making sure they are well off. timeforcommonsense
  • Score: -4

12:07pm Sun 25 May 14

psch says...

The Burnley constituency has been saddled with inadequate local candidates for half a century and when we got a candidate with real ability she turned out to be bent.
The current candidate through naïve and incompetent campaigning at the last election managed to lose a safe Labour seat and shows no signs of doing anything better this time
Come on deselect her and put a decent candidate in place or Birtwistle's personal vote, tactical Tory voting and UKIP will result in a "surprise" Liberal Democrat victory.
The Burnley constituency has been saddled with inadequate local candidates for half a century and when we got a candidate with real ability she turned out to be bent. The current candidate through naïve and incompetent campaigning at the last election managed to lose a safe Labour seat and shows no signs of doing anything better this time Come on deselect her and put a decent candidate in place or Birtwistle's personal vote, tactical Tory voting and UKIP will result in a "surprise" Liberal Democrat victory. psch
  • Score: 8

12:35pm Sun 25 May 14

Excluded again says...

timeforcommonsense wrote:
Who allowed the banks the freedom to stuff up the economy? It happens every time with Labour. They get in, stuff up the country and then hand a pile of crap to who ever takes over. Regardless of where these people are educated they are all massively out of touch with what is going on in this country and all too interested with making sure they are well off.
Your first sentence is a fair point. Labour (along with almost every other government in the world) allowed a pitifully weak system of regulating the banks to develop.

However, at the time, the criticism of the Labour government by the then Tory opposition was that the pitifully weak regulation of the banks was too tough and was proof positive that Labour was still red in tooth and claw. Right up until the financial crash (and for a short time after) the Tories were pushing for more and more deregulation of the banks.
[quote][p][bold]timeforcommonsense[/bold] wrote: Who allowed the banks the freedom to stuff up the economy? It happens every time with Labour. They get in, stuff up the country and then hand a pile of crap to who ever takes over. Regardless of where these people are educated they are all massively out of touch with what is going on in this country and all too interested with making sure they are well off.[/p][/quote]Your first sentence is a fair point. Labour (along with almost every other government in the world) allowed a pitifully weak system of regulating the banks to develop. However, at the time, the criticism of the Labour government by the then Tory opposition was that the pitifully weak regulation of the banks was too tough and was proof positive that Labour was still red in tooth and claw. Right up until the financial crash (and for a short time after) the Tories were pushing for more and more deregulation of the banks. Excluded again
  • Score: 8

1:02am Mon 26 May 14

time will tell says...

timeforcommonsense wrote:
Who allowed the banks the freedom to stuff up the economy? It happens every time with Labour. They get in, stuff up the country and then hand a pile of crap to who ever takes over. Regardless of where these people are educated they are all massively out of touch with what is going on in this country and all too interested with making sure they are well off.
The world and his uncle knows that the banker-loving Tories wanted less regulation for the banks - you must have learning difficulties if you are not aware of this.
[quote][p][bold]timeforcommonsense[/bold] wrote: Who allowed the banks the freedom to stuff up the economy? It happens every time with Labour. They get in, stuff up the country and then hand a pile of crap to who ever takes over. Regardless of where these people are educated they are all massively out of touch with what is going on in this country and all too interested with making sure they are well off.[/p][/quote]The world and his uncle knows that the banker-loving Tories wanted less regulation for the banks - you must have learning difficulties if you are not aware of this. time will tell
  • Score: 8

7:04am Mon 26 May 14

liddle 'un says...

Excluded again wrote:
timeforcommonsense wrote:
I have been astounded by the sheer stupidity of people in the North West. What tiny memories people have. Why the hell would anyone want labour in charge? It's like handing the wheel of a crashed car back over to the drunk driver who smashed it up. This country is having to make huge cuts BECAUSE of LABOUR, who handed the country over to the Conservatives with NO MONEY left in the pot. Does anybody really think that this party is the working man party for the working men? They are all chinless public school boys who are far removed from the real world.
No, the country is in a mess because of the worldwide financial crash in 2007-08. Which meant governments all over the world had to pump hundreds of billions into the banks to prevent the world economy collapsing.

It didn't matter whether governments were from the centre, the left or the right They all had to pump in billions of dollars, euros, pounds or any other currency going, Britain's share was an eye-watering £800 billion. And that is why there was no money left.

PS on a purely factual point, all of the people holding the top five jobs in the Labour Party (Leader, Deputy Leader. Shadow Chancellor, Home Secretary and Foreign Secretary) went to state schools.
You're obviously a rabid lefty but I acknowledge your attempts at trying airbrush out Labour's role in wrecking this country's finances. Trying to reverse out historical facts is never easy.

As an encore, can you now try to persuade the rest of us that Gordon Brown was not gaff prone fool?
[quote][p][bold]Excluded again[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]timeforcommonsense[/bold] wrote: I have been astounded by the sheer stupidity of people in the North West. What tiny memories people have. Why the hell would anyone want labour in charge? It's like handing the wheel of a crashed car back over to the drunk driver who smashed it up. This country is having to make huge cuts BECAUSE of LABOUR, who handed the country over to the Conservatives with NO MONEY left in the pot. Does anybody really think that this party is the working man party for the working men? They are all chinless public school boys who are far removed from the real world.[/p][/quote]No, the country is in a mess because of the worldwide financial crash in 2007-08. Which meant governments all over the world had to pump hundreds of billions into the banks to prevent the world economy collapsing. It didn't matter whether governments were from the centre, the left or the right They all had to pump in billions of dollars, euros, pounds or any other currency going, Britain's share was an eye-watering £800 billion. And that is why there was no money left. PS on a purely factual point, all of the people holding the top five jobs in the Labour Party (Leader, Deputy Leader. Shadow Chancellor, Home Secretary and Foreign Secretary) went to state schools.[/p][/quote]You're obviously a rabid lefty but I acknowledge your attempts at trying airbrush out Labour's role in wrecking this country's finances. Trying to reverse out historical facts is never easy. As an encore, can you now try to persuade the rest of us that Gordon Brown was not gaff prone fool? liddle 'un
  • Score: -5

7:18am Mon 26 May 14

Excluded again says...

liddle 'un wrote:
Excluded again wrote:
timeforcommonsense wrote:
I have been astounded by the sheer stupidity of people in the North West. What tiny memories people have. Why the hell would anyone want labour in charge? It's like handing the wheel of a crashed car back over to the drunk driver who smashed it up. This country is having to make huge cuts BECAUSE of LABOUR, who handed the country over to the Conservatives with NO MONEY left in the pot. Does anybody really think that this party is the working man party for the working men? They are all chinless public school boys who are far removed from the real world.
No, the country is in a mess because of the worldwide financial crash in 2007-08. Which meant governments all over the world had to pump hundreds of billions into the banks to prevent the world economy collapsing.

It didn't matter whether governments were from the centre, the left or the right They all had to pump in billions of dollars, euros, pounds or any other currency going, Britain's share was an eye-watering £800 billion. And that is why there was no money left.

PS on a purely factual point, all of the people holding the top five jobs in the Labour Party (Leader, Deputy Leader. Shadow Chancellor, Home Secretary and Foreign Secretary) went to state schools.
You're obviously a rabid lefty but I acknowledge your attempts at trying airbrush out Labour's role in wrecking this country's finances. Trying to reverse out historical facts is never easy.

As an encore, can you now try to persuade the rest of us that Gordon Brown was not gaff prone fool?
Trying to rewrite historical facts? I think you will find that I am not the one who is denying that there was a worldwide financial crash in 2007-08.

If saying that there was a worldwide financial crash in 2007-08 makes you a rabid lefty, I think you will find that the vast majority of economists, historians and commentators are rabid lefties. Or just people who write about what actually happened.
[quote][p][bold]liddle 'un[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Excluded again[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]timeforcommonsense[/bold] wrote: I have been astounded by the sheer stupidity of people in the North West. What tiny memories people have. Why the hell would anyone want labour in charge? It's like handing the wheel of a crashed car back over to the drunk driver who smashed it up. This country is having to make huge cuts BECAUSE of LABOUR, who handed the country over to the Conservatives with NO MONEY left in the pot. Does anybody really think that this party is the working man party for the working men? They are all chinless public school boys who are far removed from the real world.[/p][/quote]No, the country is in a mess because of the worldwide financial crash in 2007-08. Which meant governments all over the world had to pump hundreds of billions into the banks to prevent the world economy collapsing. It didn't matter whether governments were from the centre, the left or the right They all had to pump in billions of dollars, euros, pounds or any other currency going, Britain's share was an eye-watering £800 billion. And that is why there was no money left. PS on a purely factual point, all of the people holding the top five jobs in the Labour Party (Leader, Deputy Leader. Shadow Chancellor, Home Secretary and Foreign Secretary) went to state schools.[/p][/quote]You're obviously a rabid lefty but I acknowledge your attempts at trying airbrush out Labour's role in wrecking this country's finances. Trying to reverse out historical facts is never easy. As an encore, can you now try to persuade the rest of us that Gordon Brown was not gaff prone fool?[/p][/quote]Trying to rewrite historical facts? I think you will find that I am not the one who is denying that there was a worldwide financial crash in 2007-08. If saying that there was a worldwide financial crash in 2007-08 makes you a rabid lefty, I think you will find that the vast majority of economists, historians and commentators are rabid lefties. Or just people who write about what actually happened. Excluded again
  • Score: 8

8:08am Mon 26 May 14

Kevin, Colne says...

There are a number of myths surrounding the economic and financial catastrophe that befell the United Kingdom in 2007.

The first is that no one saw it coming. The second is that the Labour Party, which then was in government, was solely or primarily to blame.

If one reads beyond the mainstream press – the many books and articles in periodicals written on the subject - a very different picture emerges.

Point number one: There were a number of highly qualified economists and others that foretold of a looming debt crisis; and that it had been 30 to 40 years in the making. Some of these warnings had been made during the time of the last Conservative administration and long before the Labour Party took office in 1997.

Point number two: It is very apparent that the seeds of the crisis were many and varied but ultimately the dominant paradigm of neo-liberalism – that the guiding self-interest of economic agents and the market process should be left unfettered to work its magic – was flawed, at least when applied to financial entities.

Point number three: Monetary policy undoubtedly played a part in fostering instability but this was not controlled by the government – it was in the hands of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee, although the Government did set the price inflation target, which excluded asset prices. This was the perceived wisdom of central banking worldwide.

Philip Cogan, of the Financial Times, in his book Paper Promises: Money, Debt and the New World Order provided a succinct account of the situation that summarises the facts rather well:

The debt crisis broke in 2007. It started with the most egregious bubble, that in American sub-prime mortgage lending. Like many previous bubbles … it involved a boom in lending that pushed asset prices up to unprecedented highs. What made the crisis so pervasive was the way that mortgage loans had been repackaged and distributed. No one was quite sure where the risks had ended up and who was most exposed. The combination of that uncertainty and the highly geared nature of the financial sector proved calamitous.

The autumn of 2008 was a classic example of market panic. Investors ceased to care about the return on their capital and started to worry about the return of their capital. The only way to halt the crisis was for governments to step in and guarantee the banking sector. The result, however, was a phenomenal rise in the level of sovereign – government – debt. In time, this eventually led to the second stage of the debt crisis, which began in early 2010 with concerns about the finances of Greece. Cogan, p.177-82.

This is not to say that the Labour Government did not make some very serious policy errors: belief that they had abolished Tory boom and bust was hubris of the highest order, mistaking a credit boom for structural growth was a grave mistake, the selling of much of our gold reserves was wholly misguided, the failure to establish a Sovereign Wealth Fund was an opportunity missed; but by the same token Gordon Brown’s refusal to permit the country to join the Euro deserves praise for this has allowed policy-makers greater freedom to manage the post-critical stage of the crisis.

We are living through the next stage of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. It is absolutely tragic that a false mythology about the cause of this event has taken root and become widely accepted, but there again perhaps this is not surprising given the pitiful state of much national journalism.
There are a number of myths surrounding the economic and financial catastrophe that befell the United Kingdom in 2007. The first is that no one saw it coming. The second is that the Labour Party, which then was in government, was solely or primarily to blame. If one reads beyond the mainstream press – the many books and articles in periodicals written on the subject - a very different picture emerges. Point number one: There were a number of highly qualified economists and others that foretold of a looming debt crisis; and that it had been 30 to 40 years in the making. Some of these warnings had been made during the time of the last Conservative administration and long before the Labour Party took office in 1997. Point number two: It is very apparent that the seeds of the crisis were many and varied but ultimately the dominant paradigm of neo-liberalism – that the guiding self-interest of economic agents and the market process should be left unfettered to work its magic – was flawed, at least when applied to financial entities. Point number three: Monetary policy undoubtedly played a part in fostering instability but this was not controlled by the government – it was in the hands of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee, although the Government did set the price inflation target, which excluded asset prices. This was the perceived wisdom of central banking worldwide. Philip Cogan, of the Financial Times, in his book Paper Promises: Money, Debt and the New World Order provided a succinct account of the situation that summarises the facts rather well: The debt crisis broke in 2007. It started with the most egregious bubble, that in American sub-prime mortgage lending. Like many previous bubbles … it involved a boom in lending that pushed asset prices up to unprecedented highs. What made the crisis so pervasive was the way that mortgage loans had been repackaged and distributed. No one was quite sure where the risks had ended up and who was most exposed. The combination of that uncertainty and the highly geared nature of the financial sector proved calamitous. … The autumn of 2008 was a classic example of market panic. Investors ceased to care about the return on their capital and started to worry about the return of their capital. The only way to halt the crisis was for governments to step in and guarantee the banking sector. The result, however, was a phenomenal rise in the level of sovereign – government – debt. In time, this eventually led to the second stage of the debt crisis, which began in early 2010 with concerns about the finances of Greece. Cogan, p.177-82. This is not to say that the Labour Government did not make some very serious policy errors: belief that they had abolished Tory boom and bust was hubris of the highest order, mistaking a credit boom for structural growth was a grave mistake, the selling of much of our gold reserves was wholly misguided, the failure to establish a Sovereign Wealth Fund was an opportunity missed; but by the same token Gordon Brown’s refusal to permit the country to join the Euro deserves praise for this has allowed policy-makers greater freedom to manage the post-critical stage of the crisis. We are living through the next stage of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. It is absolutely tragic that a false mythology about the cause of this event has taken root and become widely accepted, but there again perhaps this is not surprising given the pitiful state of much national journalism. Kevin, Colne
  • Score: 7

8:23am Mon 26 May 14

Kevin, Colne says...

Sorry but I should have mentioned that Coggan's book - and I've spelt his surname correctly this time - was published in first in 2011 and again in 2012.

What I find disturbing is that four years on Coggan's argument that the crisis will pit old against young, rich against poor, taxpayers against public sector and one country against other and which will lead to a new world order is looking eerily prescient.
Sorry but I should have mentioned that Coggan's book - and I've spelt his surname correctly this time - was published in first in 2011 and again in 2012. What I find disturbing is that four years on Coggan's argument that the crisis will pit old against young, rich against poor, taxpayers against public sector and one country against other and which will lead to a new world order is looking eerily prescient. Kevin, Colne
  • Score: 1

9:15am Mon 26 May 14

DaveBurnley says...

Excellent post Kevin.
Excellent post Kevin. DaveBurnley
  • Score: 2

9:18am Mon 26 May 14

Jack Herer says...

It is a fairly simple choice for the people of Burnley:

If they want their town to be more like Blackburn, then vote Labour.

If they don't, then vote Lib Dem.

They may want to visit Blackburn to help them make a decision. It won't matter which direction they arrive from, or what time of day they choose to come - Labour's truly abysmal legacy for Blackburn is clear from every angle, night or day.
It is a fairly simple choice for the people of Burnley: If they want their town to be more like Blackburn, then vote Labour. If they don't, then vote Lib Dem. They may want to visit Blackburn to help them make a decision. It won't matter which direction they arrive from, or what time of day they choose to come - Labour's truly abysmal legacy for Blackburn is clear from every angle, night or day. Jack Herer
  • Score: -1

9:35am Mon 26 May 14

Jack Herer says...

Kevin, Colne wrote:
There are a number of myths surrounding the economic and financial catastrophe that befell the United Kingdom in 2007.

The first is that no one saw it coming. The second is that the Labour Party, which then was in government, was solely or primarily to blame.

If one reads beyond the mainstream press – the many books and articles in periodicals written on the subject - a very different picture emerges.

Point number one: There were a number of highly qualified economists and others that foretold of a looming debt crisis; and that it had been 30 to 40 years in the making. Some of these warnings had been made during the time of the last Conservative administration and long before the Labour Party took office in 1997.

Point number two: It is very apparent that the seeds of the crisis were many and varied but ultimately the dominant paradigm of neo-liberalism – that the guiding self-interest of economic agents and the market process should be left unfettered to work its magic – was flawed, at least when applied to financial entities.

Point number three: Monetary policy undoubtedly played a part in fostering instability but this was not controlled by the government – it was in the hands of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee, although the Government did set the price inflation target, which excluded asset prices. This was the perceived wisdom of central banking worldwide.

Philip Cogan, of the Financial Times, in his book Paper Promises: Money, Debt and the New World Order provided a succinct account of the situation that summarises the facts rather well:

The debt crisis broke in 2007. It started with the most egregious bubble, that in American sub-prime mortgage lending. Like many previous bubbles … it involved a boom in lending that pushed asset prices up to unprecedented highs. What made the crisis so pervasive was the way that mortgage loans had been repackaged and distributed. No one was quite sure where the risks had ended up and who was most exposed. The combination of that uncertainty and the highly geared nature of the financial sector proved calamitous.

The autumn of 2008 was a classic example of market panic. Investors ceased to care about the return on their capital and started to worry about the return of their capital. The only way to halt the crisis was for governments to step in and guarantee the banking sector. The result, however, was a phenomenal rise in the level of sovereign – government – debt. In time, this eventually led to the second stage of the debt crisis, which began in early 2010 with concerns about the finances of Greece. Cogan, p.177-82.

This is not to say that the Labour Government did not make some very serious policy errors: belief that they had abolished Tory boom and bust was hubris of the highest order, mistaking a credit boom for structural growth was a grave mistake, the selling of much of our gold reserves was wholly misguided, the failure to establish a Sovereign Wealth Fund was an opportunity missed; but by the same token Gordon Brown’s refusal to permit the country to join the Euro deserves praise for this has allowed policy-makers greater freedom to manage the post-critical stage of the crisis.

We are living through the next stage of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. It is absolutely tragic that a false mythology about the cause of this event has taken root and become widely accepted, but there again perhaps this is not surprising given the pitiful state of much national journalism.
No one is denying that there were outside factors, its just Labour's complete ineptitude magnified the problem.

Light touch regulation anyone? Bankers knighted aplenty? The worse bankers given top jobs at the regulatory authorities?

All Labour's wonderful financial plans to success. Or not as the case was.

Furthermore, Labour made our problem far, far worse than it needed to be because they followed the bankers same crazy financial model for Britain itself. Debt upon debt upon debt, paid for by our children and our grandchildren. This wasn't debt to bail the banks out - it was simply debt that Labour decided we should run the country's finances by.

I mean - wtf?!?

I appreciated that hindsight is a wonderful thing, but you couldn't make up how bad the last Labour government was for Britian. And the bad news for Labour this time round is that the same inept people - Ed Miliband and Ed Balls - are still there at the centre of things to mess things up again if they get back in.

Face facts Kevin - Labour are woefully inept when it comes to running an economy. So much so that the mess they leave behind is shocking. We are still clearing up Labour's terrible mess now, and will be for years.

Boom and bust isn't some invention of the Tories incidentally, it is an unfortunate by-product of stock market based capitalism. You clearly need to read more than one book.
[quote][p][bold]Kevin, Colne[/bold] wrote: There are a number of myths surrounding the economic and financial catastrophe that befell the United Kingdom in 2007. The first is that no one saw it coming. The second is that the Labour Party, which then was in government, was solely or primarily to blame. If one reads beyond the mainstream press – the many books and articles in periodicals written on the subject - a very different picture emerges. Point number one: There were a number of highly qualified economists and others that foretold of a looming debt crisis; and that it had been 30 to 40 years in the making. Some of these warnings had been made during the time of the last Conservative administration and long before the Labour Party took office in 1997. Point number two: It is very apparent that the seeds of the crisis were many and varied but ultimately the dominant paradigm of neo-liberalism – that the guiding self-interest of economic agents and the market process should be left unfettered to work its magic – was flawed, at least when applied to financial entities. Point number three: Monetary policy undoubtedly played a part in fostering instability but this was not controlled by the government – it was in the hands of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee, although the Government did set the price inflation target, which excluded asset prices. This was the perceived wisdom of central banking worldwide. Philip Cogan, of the Financial Times, in his book Paper Promises: Money, Debt and the New World Order provided a succinct account of the situation that summarises the facts rather well: The debt crisis broke in 2007. It started with the most egregious bubble, that in American sub-prime mortgage lending. Like many previous bubbles … it involved a boom in lending that pushed asset prices up to unprecedented highs. What made the crisis so pervasive was the way that mortgage loans had been repackaged and distributed. No one was quite sure where the risks had ended up and who was most exposed. The combination of that uncertainty and the highly geared nature of the financial sector proved calamitous. … The autumn of 2008 was a classic example of market panic. Investors ceased to care about the return on their capital and started to worry about the return of their capital. The only way to halt the crisis was for governments to step in and guarantee the banking sector. The result, however, was a phenomenal rise in the level of sovereign – government – debt. In time, this eventually led to the second stage of the debt crisis, which began in early 2010 with concerns about the finances of Greece. Cogan, p.177-82. This is not to say that the Labour Government did not make some very serious policy errors: belief that they had abolished Tory boom and bust was hubris of the highest order, mistaking a credit boom for structural growth was a grave mistake, the selling of much of our gold reserves was wholly misguided, the failure to establish a Sovereign Wealth Fund was an opportunity missed; but by the same token Gordon Brown’s refusal to permit the country to join the Euro deserves praise for this has allowed policy-makers greater freedom to manage the post-critical stage of the crisis. We are living through the next stage of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. It is absolutely tragic that a false mythology about the cause of this event has taken root and become widely accepted, but there again perhaps this is not surprising given the pitiful state of much national journalism.[/p][/quote]No one is denying that there were outside factors, its just Labour's complete ineptitude magnified the problem. Light touch regulation anyone? Bankers knighted aplenty? The worse bankers given top jobs at the regulatory authorities? All Labour's wonderful financial plans to success. Or not as the case was. Furthermore, Labour made our problem far, far worse than it needed to be because they followed the bankers same crazy financial model for Britain itself. Debt upon debt upon debt, paid for by our children and our grandchildren. This wasn't debt to bail the banks out - it was simply debt that Labour decided we should run the country's finances by. I mean - wtf?!? I appreciated that hindsight is a wonderful thing, but you couldn't make up how bad the last Labour government was for Britian. And the bad news for Labour this time round is that the same inept people - Ed Miliband and Ed Balls - are still there at the centre of things to mess things up again if they get back in. Face facts Kevin - Labour are woefully inept when it comes to running an economy. So much so that the mess they leave behind is shocking. We are still clearing up Labour's terrible mess now, and will be for years. Boom and bust isn't some invention of the Tories incidentally, it is an unfortunate by-product of stock market based capitalism. You clearly need to read more than one book. Jack Herer
  • Score: -3

9:53am Mon 26 May 14

Jack Herer says...

time will tell wrote:
timeforcommonsense wrote:
Who allowed the banks the freedom to stuff up the economy? It happens every time with Labour. They get in, stuff up the country and then hand a pile of crap to who ever takes over. Regardless of where these people are educated they are all massively out of touch with what is going on in this country and all too interested with making sure they are well off.
The world and his uncle knows that the banker-loving Tories wanted less regulation for the banks - you must have learning difficulties if you are not aware of this.
I appreciate you find the truth uncomfortable, but it was Gordon Brown, not the Tories, who was neck deep with the bankers.

Light touch regulation wasn't some Tory invention, it was Gordon's baby.

Blaming the opposition for the mess created by the government in power, which was Labour, is clearly perverse to be honest.

Face facts - Labour messed up big time as they always do with the economy, except this time they did so by being best buddies with greedy, corrupt bankers.

With the same weak-willed people around this time for Labour, i.e. wet Ed Miliband and red Ed Balls, it's difficult to see how that ineptitude wouldn't continue if they got back into power.

It's always the same legacy with a Labour government - a ginormous financial mess.
[quote][p][bold]time will tell[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]timeforcommonsense[/bold] wrote: Who allowed the banks the freedom to stuff up the economy? It happens every time with Labour. They get in, stuff up the country and then hand a pile of crap to who ever takes over. Regardless of where these people are educated they are all massively out of touch with what is going on in this country and all too interested with making sure they are well off.[/p][/quote]The world and his uncle knows that the banker-loving Tories wanted less regulation for the banks - you must have learning difficulties if you are not aware of this.[/p][/quote]I appreciate you find the truth uncomfortable, but it was Gordon Brown, not the Tories, who was neck deep with the bankers. Light touch regulation wasn't some Tory invention, it was Gordon's baby. Blaming the opposition for the mess created by the government in power, which was Labour, is clearly perverse to be honest. Face facts - Labour messed up big time as they always do with the economy, except this time they did so by being best buddies with greedy, corrupt bankers. With the same weak-willed people around this time for Labour, i.e. wet Ed Miliband and red Ed Balls, it's difficult to see how that ineptitude wouldn't continue if they got back into power. It's always the same legacy with a Labour government - a ginormous financial mess. Jack Herer
  • Score: -3

1:01pm Mon 26 May 14

Kevin, Colne says...

Jack Herer wrote:
Kevin, Colne wrote:
There are a number of myths surrounding the economic and financial catastrophe that befell the United Kingdom in 2007.

The first is that no one saw it coming. The second is that the Labour Party, which then was in government, was solely or primarily to blame.

If one reads beyond the mainstream press – the many books and articles in periodicals written on the subject - a very different picture emerges.

Point number one: There were a number of highly qualified economists and others that foretold of a looming debt crisis; and that it had been 30 to 40 years in the making. Some of these warnings had been made during the time of the last Conservative administration and long before the Labour Party took office in 1997.

Point number two: It is very apparent that the seeds of the crisis were many and varied but ultimately the dominant paradigm of neo-liberalism – that the guiding self-interest of economic agents and the market process should be left unfettered to work its magic – was flawed, at least when applied to financial entities.

Point number three: Monetary policy undoubtedly played a part in fostering instability but this was not controlled by the government – it was in the hands of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee, although the Government did set the price inflation target, which excluded asset prices. This was the perceived wisdom of central banking worldwide.

Philip Cogan, of the Financial Times, in his book Paper Promises: Money, Debt and the New World Order provided a succinct account of the situation that summarises the facts rather well:

The debt crisis broke in 2007. It started with the most egregious bubble, that in American sub-prime mortgage lending. Like many previous bubbles … it involved a boom in lending that pushed asset prices up to unprecedented highs. What made the crisis so pervasive was the way that mortgage loans had been repackaged and distributed. No one was quite sure where the risks had ended up and who was most exposed. The combination of that uncertainty and the highly geared nature of the financial sector proved calamitous.

The autumn of 2008 was a classic example of market panic. Investors ceased to care about the return on their capital and started to worry about the return of their capital. The only way to halt the crisis was for governments to step in and guarantee the banking sector. The result, however, was a phenomenal rise in the level of sovereign – government – debt. In time, this eventually led to the second stage of the debt crisis, which began in early 2010 with concerns about the finances of Greece. Cogan, p.177-82.

This is not to say that the Labour Government did not make some very serious policy errors: belief that they had abolished Tory boom and bust was hubris of the highest order, mistaking a credit boom for structural growth was a grave mistake, the selling of much of our gold reserves was wholly misguided, the failure to establish a Sovereign Wealth Fund was an opportunity missed; but by the same token Gordon Brown’s refusal to permit the country to join the Euro deserves praise for this has allowed policy-makers greater freedom to manage the post-critical stage of the crisis.

We are living through the next stage of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. It is absolutely tragic that a false mythology about the cause of this event has taken root and become widely accepted, but there again perhaps this is not surprising given the pitiful state of much national journalism.
No one is denying that there were outside factors, its just Labour's complete ineptitude magnified the problem.

Light touch regulation anyone? Bankers knighted aplenty? The worse bankers given top jobs at the regulatory authorities?

All Labour's wonderful financial plans to success. Or not as the case was.

Furthermore, Labour made our problem far, far worse than it needed to be because they followed the bankers same crazy financial model for Britain itself. Debt upon debt upon debt, paid for by our children and our grandchildren. This wasn't debt to bail the banks out - it was simply debt that Labour decided we should run the country's finances by.

I mean - wtf?!?

I appreciated that hindsight is a wonderful thing, but you couldn't make up how bad the last Labour government was for Britian. And the bad news for Labour this time round is that the same inept people - Ed Miliband and Ed Balls - are still there at the centre of things to mess things up again if they get back in.

Face facts Kevin - Labour are woefully inept when it comes to running an economy. So much so that the mess they leave behind is shocking. We are still clearing up Labour's terrible mess now, and will be for years.

Boom and bust isn't some invention of the Tories incidentally, it is an unfortunate by-product of stock market based capitalism. You clearly need to read more than one book.
My understanding is that the light-touch regulation adopted by the Labour Party was adhering to the then dominant paradigm that can be traced back to the ideological leadership that came from the Chicago school of economics led by Milton Friedman, and which had been adopted with great enthusiasm some decades earlier by the Republican Party in the USA and the Conservative Party in the UK.

As it so happens I have read more than one book and one of the best accounts of the banking crisis can be found in Chapter 12 of Phillip Augar’s book Reckless: The Rise and Fall of the City, and previously published as Chasing Alpha: How Reckless Growth and Unchecked Ambition Ruined The City’s Golden Decade.

Augar, to his credit, is highly critical of the light-touch regulation but acknowledges its’ primary source and discusses two other phenomena that contributed in no small measure to the catastrophe – the concept of shareholder value and arising from this the development of managerial compensation based upon incentives that encouraged inappropriate behaviour. In short Augar places the notion of light-touch regulation in correct historical context.

My view, for what it’s worth, is that a self-serving, self-feeding loop was created and while this was producing the goods no one dared to question it. When the goose is laying golden eggs, it’s not wise to upset the goose.

I agree that debt, both public and private, grew rapidly under the period that the Labour Party was in office but this was merely a continuation of a trend that began many decades earlier. Peter Warbuton’s book Debt and Delusion written in 1997-98 sets the facts out very clearly, in my opinion.

In short: by 1997 we were already headed for disaster.

I am sorry that you gained the impression that I consider boom and bust to be an invention of the Tories. This certainly is not my view. This is one the reasons that I re-read John Kenneth Galbraith’s Short History of Financial Euphoria regularly – it’s the best £6.99 that I ever spent. Nevertheless, I should have made it plain that the statement was attributed to Gordon Brown, but I did indicate that I considered it to be hubris of the highest order.

I agree that the Labour Front Bench team does not inspire confidence and the thought of Ed Balls as Chancellor of the Exchequer sure puts the mind up me.

In closing, I’m sorry that you feel that I do not do enough reading and I apologize for my inadequacy in this regard. For the record I have read a great many books on the economic catastrophe largely because I genuinely wish to know and understand a crisis the like of which has not been seen in living memory, and the impact of which has not only been very great but the effects have many, many years still to run.
[quote][p][bold]Jack Herer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kevin, Colne[/bold] wrote: There are a number of myths surrounding the economic and financial catastrophe that befell the United Kingdom in 2007. The first is that no one saw it coming. The second is that the Labour Party, which then was in government, was solely or primarily to blame. If one reads beyond the mainstream press – the many books and articles in periodicals written on the subject - a very different picture emerges. Point number one: There were a number of highly qualified economists and others that foretold of a looming debt crisis; and that it had been 30 to 40 years in the making. Some of these warnings had been made during the time of the last Conservative administration and long before the Labour Party took office in 1997. Point number two: It is very apparent that the seeds of the crisis were many and varied but ultimately the dominant paradigm of neo-liberalism – that the guiding self-interest of economic agents and the market process should be left unfettered to work its magic – was flawed, at least when applied to financial entities. Point number three: Monetary policy undoubtedly played a part in fostering instability but this was not controlled by the government – it was in the hands of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee, although the Government did set the price inflation target, which excluded asset prices. This was the perceived wisdom of central banking worldwide. Philip Cogan, of the Financial Times, in his book Paper Promises: Money, Debt and the New World Order provided a succinct account of the situation that summarises the facts rather well: The debt crisis broke in 2007. It started with the most egregious bubble, that in American sub-prime mortgage lending. Like many previous bubbles … it involved a boom in lending that pushed asset prices up to unprecedented highs. What made the crisis so pervasive was the way that mortgage loans had been repackaged and distributed. No one was quite sure where the risks had ended up and who was most exposed. The combination of that uncertainty and the highly geared nature of the financial sector proved calamitous. … The autumn of 2008 was a classic example of market panic. Investors ceased to care about the return on their capital and started to worry about the return of their capital. The only way to halt the crisis was for governments to step in and guarantee the banking sector. The result, however, was a phenomenal rise in the level of sovereign – government – debt. In time, this eventually led to the second stage of the debt crisis, which began in early 2010 with concerns about the finances of Greece. Cogan, p.177-82. This is not to say that the Labour Government did not make some very serious policy errors: belief that they had abolished Tory boom and bust was hubris of the highest order, mistaking a credit boom for structural growth was a grave mistake, the selling of much of our gold reserves was wholly misguided, the failure to establish a Sovereign Wealth Fund was an opportunity missed; but by the same token Gordon Brown’s refusal to permit the country to join the Euro deserves praise for this has allowed policy-makers greater freedom to manage the post-critical stage of the crisis. We are living through the next stage of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. It is absolutely tragic that a false mythology about the cause of this event has taken root and become widely accepted, but there again perhaps this is not surprising given the pitiful state of much national journalism.[/p][/quote]No one is denying that there were outside factors, its just Labour's complete ineptitude magnified the problem. Light touch regulation anyone? Bankers knighted aplenty? The worse bankers given top jobs at the regulatory authorities? All Labour's wonderful financial plans to success. Or not as the case was. Furthermore, Labour made our problem far, far worse than it needed to be because they followed the bankers same crazy financial model for Britain itself. Debt upon debt upon debt, paid for by our children and our grandchildren. This wasn't debt to bail the banks out - it was simply debt that Labour decided we should run the country's finances by. I mean - wtf?!? I appreciated that hindsight is a wonderful thing, but you couldn't make up how bad the last Labour government was for Britian. And the bad news for Labour this time round is that the same inept people - Ed Miliband and Ed Balls - are still there at the centre of things to mess things up again if they get back in. Face facts Kevin - Labour are woefully inept when it comes to running an economy. So much so that the mess they leave behind is shocking. We are still clearing up Labour's terrible mess now, and will be for years. Boom and bust isn't some invention of the Tories incidentally, it is an unfortunate by-product of stock market based capitalism. You clearly need to read more than one book.[/p][/quote]My understanding is that the light-touch regulation adopted by the Labour Party was adhering to the then dominant paradigm that can be traced back to the ideological leadership that came from the Chicago school of economics led by Milton Friedman, and which had been adopted with great enthusiasm some decades earlier by the Republican Party in the USA and the Conservative Party in the UK. As it so happens I have read more than one book and one of the best accounts of the banking crisis can be found in Chapter 12 of Phillip Augar’s book Reckless: The Rise and Fall of the City, and previously published as Chasing Alpha: How Reckless Growth and Unchecked Ambition Ruined The City’s Golden Decade. Augar, to his credit, is highly critical of the light-touch regulation but acknowledges its’ primary source and discusses two other phenomena that contributed in no small measure to the catastrophe – the concept of shareholder value and arising from this the development of managerial compensation based upon incentives that encouraged inappropriate behaviour. In short Augar places the notion of light-touch regulation in correct historical context. My view, for what it’s worth, is that a self-serving, self-feeding loop was created and while this was producing the goods no one dared to question it. When the goose is laying golden eggs, it’s not wise to upset the goose. I agree that debt, both public and private, grew rapidly under the period that the Labour Party was in office but this was merely a continuation of a trend that began many decades earlier. Peter Warbuton’s book Debt and Delusion written in 1997-98 sets the facts out very clearly, in my opinion. In short: by 1997 we were already headed for disaster. I am sorry that you gained the impression that I consider boom and bust to be an invention of the Tories. This certainly is not my view. This is one the reasons that I re-read John Kenneth Galbraith’s Short History of Financial Euphoria regularly – it’s the best £6.99 that I ever spent. Nevertheless, I should have made it plain that the statement was attributed to Gordon Brown, but I did indicate that I considered it to be hubris of the highest order. I agree that the Labour Front Bench team does not inspire confidence and the thought of Ed Balls as Chancellor of the Exchequer sure puts the mind up me. In closing, I’m sorry that you feel that I do not do enough reading and I apologize for my inadequacy in this regard. For the record I have read a great many books on the economic catastrophe largely because I genuinely wish to know and understand a crisis the like of which has not been seen in living memory, and the impact of which has not only been very great but the effects have many, many years still to run. Kevin, Colne
  • Score: 2

1:19pm Mon 26 May 14

slants says...

She has been my councillor in Bank Hall for god knows how many years and i have never once seen her in the ward.Just lately I emailed the other councillor Frayling about a council ward matter 6/7 times and got no reply; so I emailed Cooper 2 times and got no reply ,I emailed Birtwistle and got a reply immediately and a follow up letter expressing his disgust that the leader of the council and another councillor didn't reply to a constituent.
I know who i would rather see in office and its not the waste of space Cooper who is after the money and her ego.
She has been my councillor in Bank Hall for god knows how many years and i have never once seen her in the ward.Just lately I emailed the other councillor Frayling about a council ward matter 6/7 times and got no reply; so I emailed Cooper 2 times and got no reply ,I emailed Birtwistle and got a reply immediately and a follow up letter expressing his disgust that the leader of the council and another councillor didn't reply to a constituent. I know who i would rather see in office and its not the waste of space Cooper who is after the money and her ego. slants
  • Score: 6

6:33pm Mon 26 May 14

berny55 says...

said it before.stick a labour rosette on a jackass, and people will vote for it , again i say just look at all the northern towns ,all been labour for what,60 years all dumps.
said it before.stick a labour rosette on a jackass, and people will vote for it , again i say just look at all the northern towns ,all been labour for what,60 years all dumps. berny55
  • Score: 2

8:10am Tue 27 May 14

DaveBurnley says...

slants wrote:
She has been my councillor in Bank Hall for god knows how many years and i have never once seen her in the ward.Just lately I emailed the other councillor Frayling about a council ward matter 6/7 times and got no reply; so I emailed Cooper 2 times and got no reply ,I emailed Birtwistle and got a reply immediately and a follow up letter expressing his disgust that the leader of the council and another councillor didn't reply to a constituent.
I know who i would rather see in office and its not the waste of space Cooper who is after the money and her ego.
God help Burnley if she became our MP.
[quote][p][bold]slants[/bold] wrote: She has been my councillor in Bank Hall for god knows how many years and i have never once seen her in the ward.Just lately I emailed the other councillor Frayling about a council ward matter 6/7 times and got no reply; so I emailed Cooper 2 times and got no reply ,I emailed Birtwistle and got a reply immediately and a follow up letter expressing his disgust that the leader of the council and another councillor didn't reply to a constituent. I know who i would rather see in office and its not the waste of space Cooper who is after the money and her ego.[/p][/quote]God help Burnley if she became our MP. DaveBurnley
  • Score: 4

5:27pm Tue 27 May 14

andy1 says...

Julie get rid of Berty hes worse than Kitty Kat Ussher she was a atural disaster for the town who should of never been selected Bertys a National Disaster for the town .
Julie get rid of Berty hes worse than Kitty Kat Ussher she was a atural disaster for the town who should of never been selected Bertys a National Disaster for the town . andy1
  • Score: -4

11:34pm Tue 27 May 14

beam-me-up says...

DaveBurnley wrote:
slants wrote:
She has been my councillor in Bank Hall for god knows how many years and i have never once seen her in the ward.Just lately I emailed the other councillor Frayling about a council ward matter 6/7 times and got no reply; so I emailed Cooper 2 times and got no reply ,I emailed Birtwistle and got a reply immediately and a follow up letter expressing his disgust that the leader of the council and another councillor didn't reply to a constituent.
I know who i would rather see in office and its not the waste of space Cooper who is after the money and her ego.
God help Burnley if she became our MP.
I agree with you there Dave there a wasted space yes I've been in the same position and also live in there ward. I've voted Labour all my life i'll reconsider voting Labour when the present labour Councillors have gone stepped down.
[quote][p][bold]DaveBurnley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]slants[/bold] wrote: She has been my councillor in Bank Hall for god knows how many years and i have never once seen her in the ward.Just lately I emailed the other councillor Frayling about a council ward matter 6/7 times and got no reply; so I emailed Cooper 2 times and got no reply ,I emailed Birtwistle and got a reply immediately and a follow up letter expressing his disgust that the leader of the council and another councillor didn't reply to a constituent. I know who i would rather see in office and its not the waste of space Cooper who is after the money and her ego.[/p][/quote]God help Burnley if she became our MP.[/p][/quote]I agree with you there Dave there a wasted space yes I've been in the same position and also live in there ward. I've voted Labour all my life i'll reconsider voting Labour when the present labour Councillors have gone stepped down. beam-me-up
  • Score: 1

11:38pm Tue 27 May 14

beam-me-up says...

DaveBurnley wrote:
slants wrote:
She has been my councillor in Bank Hall for god knows how many years and i have never once seen her in the ward.Just lately I emailed the other councillor Frayling about a council ward matter 6/7 times and got no reply; so I emailed Cooper 2 times and got no reply ,I emailed Birtwistle and got a reply immediately and a follow up letter expressing his disgust that the leader of the council and another councillor didn't reply to a constituent.
I know who i would rather see in office and its not the waste of space Cooper who is after the money and her ego.
God help Burnley if she became our MP.
Paul i also live in her ward and can vouch for what you say as i've also been there I'll reconsider voting labour when the present as gone.
[quote][p][bold]DaveBurnley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]slants[/bold] wrote: She has been my councillor in Bank Hall for god knows how many years and i have never once seen her in the ward.Just lately I emailed the other councillor Frayling about a council ward matter 6/7 times and got no reply; so I emailed Cooper 2 times and got no reply ,I emailed Birtwistle and got a reply immediately and a follow up letter expressing his disgust that the leader of the council and another councillor didn't reply to a constituent. I know who i would rather see in office and its not the waste of space Cooper who is after the money and her ego.[/p][/quote]God help Burnley if she became our MP.[/p][/quote]Paul i also live in her ward and can vouch for what you say as i've also been there I'll reconsider voting labour when the present as gone. beam-me-up
  • Score: 2

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