Padiham Co-operative store set to close

Former Burnley MP Peter Pike

Former Burnley MP Peter Pike

First published in News

NINETEEN jobs are at risk after the Co-operative confirmed it is to close its Padiham convenience store. 

The Co-op, which has had a presence in the town for more than 100 years, will close its Burnley Road shop on June 14.

Former Burnley MP Peter Pike described it as ‘a sad day for the staff and the local Co-operative movement’.

The closure comes just 18 months after rival retailers Tesco opened a superstore in nearby Wyre Street.

A spokesperson for The Co-operative Food said: “We can confirm that The Co-operative Food store in Burnley Road, Padiham, is to close on Saturday June 14.

“Staff at the store have been informed of the decision, which has been taken with the greatest reluctance and is due to the store’s poor trading performance. It is not, in any way, a reflection on the commitment and hard work of the store team.

“Every effort is being made to redeploy as many as possible of the 19 members of staff with The Co-operative Group, or to help them find alternative employment.”

Mr Pike, Burnley MP from 1983 to 2005, said: “As a regular shopper at Padiham Co-op I am very sorry to hear the store will close on June 14 making 19 staff redundant.

“I was a former director of the Co-op and in the 1960s the Padiham Co-op merged with Burnley Co-op to form the Pendle Co-op.

“In the 1960s there were some Co-op stores - far too many - but this closure will only leave one food outlet on Briercliffe Road, Burnley.

“It is a sad day for the staff and the local Co-operative movement.”

The future of the building has yet to be decided.

Comments (8)

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6:24pm Mon 5 May 14

fedup with your lies says...

What an awful picture.
What an awful picture. fedup with your lies
  • Score: 9

7:44pm Mon 5 May 14

johnley says...

yeah
yeah johnley
  • Score: 6

8:01pm Mon 5 May 14

ToffeeGuy says...

Sad for the staff hope they find jobs, possibly if a B&M or something opens there.

Fact is, the Co-op everywhere is TOO expensive.
Sad for the staff hope they find jobs, possibly if a B&M or something opens there. Fact is, the Co-op everywhere is TOO expensive. ToffeeGuy
  • Score: 9

9:52pm Mon 5 May 14

woolywords says...

Within my family, the Co--op, is a bit of a bone of contention, with the way that they treat my parents on their wedding day and on a day after that.
In 1948, furniture was still on the ration books and only those whom were to married could purchase new. This meant that you applied to a committee to gain permission to obtain what was known as utility furniture, (with the double cheese mark,) that many an older person will know about.
You went into the shop and either choose from a catalogue or viewed a piece that was made up of 'real wood', as a sample. In that year, newer versions of the rather tired and somewhat jaded types, was replaced with the Swedish style.
My Mum fell in love with this new style and convinced my Dad to make an application to get the whole bedroom suite of, a double wardrobe, tall boy and dressing table. Permission was given and on the date that the final payment was made, my Grandfather arranged to have it taken to their new home, straight away.
Only trouble is, the feckless shop assistant didn't realise that the suite was just a display model and not actually for sale, as it was made of real oak, instead of being the stained plywood, as it should have been under the rules.
Believe it or not, the shop manager turned up at the wedding, demanding the return of the furniture and threatening legal action if this was not done. My Grandfather dug his heels in and stated that, as far he was concerned, it was the shops mistake and they should live with it. The manager stated that he would seek legal advice and be in touch. Threatening letters were exchanged but the problem was, the shop didn't know to where the furniture was delivered to, so couldn't get a court order for it's return.
Some months later, my Mum and her friend were in the shop and were challenged by the manager, who told her to return the furniture, which my Mum refused, which led to her being banned from the shop! From then on in, and to this day, all of my family have boycotted the Co-op, in every town or city that we have lived.
That suite has been handed down and around within my family, for years, finally being sold to a furniture dealer, for around £500, which is considerably more than was originally paid for it. The money was used to finance my parents 50th wedding anniversary party, at which a glass of champers was raised to the Co-op.
Within my family, the Co--op, is a bit of a bone of contention, with the way that they treat my parents on their wedding day and on a day after that. In 1948, furniture was still on the ration books and only those whom were to married could purchase new. This meant that you applied to a committee to gain permission to obtain what was known as utility furniture, (with the double cheese mark,) that many an older person will know about. You went into the shop and either choose from a catalogue or viewed a piece that was made up of 'real wood', as a sample. In that year, newer versions of the rather tired and somewhat jaded types, was replaced with the Swedish style. My Mum fell in love with this new style and convinced my Dad to make an application to get the whole bedroom suite of, a double wardrobe, tall boy and dressing table. Permission was given and on the date that the final payment was made, my Grandfather arranged to have it taken to their new home, straight away. Only trouble is, the feckless shop assistant didn't realise that the suite was just a display model and not actually for sale, as it was made of real oak, instead of being the stained plywood, as it should have been under the rules. Believe it or not, the shop manager turned up at the wedding, demanding the return of the furniture and threatening legal action if this was not done. My Grandfather dug his heels in and stated that, as far he was concerned, it was the shops mistake and they should live with it. The manager stated that he would seek legal advice and be in touch. Threatening letters were exchanged but the problem was, the shop didn't know to where the furniture was delivered to, so couldn't get a court order for it's return. Some months later, my Mum and her friend were in the shop and were challenged by the manager, who told her to return the furniture, which my Mum refused, which led to her being banned from the shop! From then on in, and to this day, all of my family have boycotted the Co-op, in every town or city that we have lived. That suite has been handed down and around within my family, for years, finally being sold to a furniture dealer, for around £500, which is considerably more than was originally paid for it. The money was used to finance my parents 50th wedding anniversary party, at which a glass of champers was raised to the Co-op. woolywords
  • Score: 9

10:15pm Mon 5 May 14

darwenTower says...

Christ wooly, I though I could hold a grudge.
Christ wooly, I though I could hold a grudge. darwenTower
  • Score: 7

11:33pm Mon 5 May 14

petestan says...

Fantastic story woolywords although talk about holding a grudge. ;-)
Fantastic story woolywords although talk about holding a grudge. ;-) petestan
  • Score: 7

11:46am Tue 6 May 14

mavrick says...

Well done woolly, you hit the nail on the head with the co op they were no better than dictators, Yet many of the senior board members made a fortune from the co-op, they set up companies who would then get the contracts to supply the co-op with various goods and services and they creamed off the profits and a good salary to boot. The co-op was a good idea that was soon overtaken by the rich folks who had a keen eye for the potential. sadly it failed to move with the times and priced it'self out of existence. The behaviour and incompetence of it's bank was the final nail in the coffin, prior to that the under cover programmes showed the so-op funeral service in a terrible light. so all good things must come to an end.
Well done woolly, you hit the nail on the head with the co op they were no better than dictators, Yet many of the senior board members made a fortune from the co-op, they set up companies who would then get the contracts to supply the co-op with various goods and services and they creamed off the profits and a good salary to boot. The co-op was a good idea that was soon overtaken by the rich folks who had a keen eye for the potential. sadly it failed to move with the times and priced it'self out of existence. The behaviour and incompetence of it's bank was the final nail in the coffin, prior to that the under cover programmes showed the so-op funeral service in a terrible light. so all good things must come to an end. mavrick
  • Score: 3

2:08pm Tue 6 May 14

shirtbox says...

The co-op has been badly run for years by amateurs,high prices lack of stock etc.They sold Gt Harwood store years ago to Morrisons,now sell them the rest.
The co-op has been badly run for years by amateurs,high prices lack of stock etc.They sold Gt Harwood store years ago to Morrisons,now sell them the rest. shirtbox
  • Score: 1

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