Fresh hope in plan for old Brierfield homes site

REGENERATION: The site is near Brierfield Mills

REGENERATION: The site is near Brierfield Mills

First published in News Burnley and Pendle Citizen: Photograph of the Author by

A HOUSING site left mostly derelict when Government cash fell through could now be redeveloped.

The site, off Clitheroe Road, within the Brierfield Canal Corridor, was earmarked for transformation in 2008 with Housing Market Renewal funding.

But when the HMR scheme was scrapped the site was left mostly abandoned, with just a few houses in Berkeley Street left standing as some residents refused to sell up.

Last year the final seven properties were demolished and now the site, which also includes Veevers Street, Belgrave Street and Claremont Street, is set to be sold off to the council’s housing partner PEARL2.

Dean Langton, Pendle Council’s head of finance, said: “The site is close to Brierfield Mill and the Quaker Heights development, which are being redeveloped through PEARL2.

“Developing this site through PEARL2 would ensure a consistent design approach in the area and co-ordination of development phasing.”

After looking at the site PEARL2 have come up with a scheme of 46 units, with 22 three-bed houses, 10 two-bed bungalows and 14 three-bed bungalows.

Roman Korol, from the Clitheroe Road Residents’ Association, said: “There is already a lot of development going on in the area now.

“If this site is going to be redevelopment then I just hope it will be of good quality and sympathetic to the area.

“There is a lot of good things happening here with the redevelopment of the mill and this is a great opportunity to continue that with a good quality development.”

Comments (3)

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9:20pm Sat 22 Mar 14

noddy57 says...

l cannot help but admire that Victorian splendour amongst what was once a cotton community with its Victorian terraced houses from where all those families would live side by side and work all the hours they could to give their family the best they could afford from the sweat of their brow, these old mills stand out like a beacon of hope for the long lost weavers and spinners of yesterday,,
l cannot help but admire that Victorian splendour amongst what was once a cotton community with its Victorian terraced houses from where all those families would live side by side and work all the hours they could to give their family the best they could afford from the sweat of their brow, these old mills stand out like a beacon of hope for the long lost weavers and spinners of yesterday,, noddy57
  • Score: 8

11:04am Sun 23 Mar 14

doomchanter says...

Yes noddy57 it must have been great working long hours for a pittance in these gloomy mills and then going back to your cold damp terrace house sharing a toilet with the rest of the street.
I was bought up in a terrace house ( thankfully demolished now ) and can tell you now it was very damp ( mouldy walls ) and cold - when it was frosty the ice was actualy on the inside of the sash windows.
These houses would not be considered fit for habitation today and many of the terrace houses in Brierfield are similar even now, rented out by slum landlords their tennants trapped in fuel poverty .
Anyone who feels that these gloomy buildings should be saved is welcome to invest their own money in them, as a taxpayer I begrudge paying for constant renovation projects ( elevate etc ) only to see them back in the same state ten years later.
Time moves on - knock them down and use the land and stone to build decent modern homes.
Yes noddy57 it must have been great working long hours for a pittance in these gloomy mills and then going back to your cold damp terrace house sharing a toilet with the rest of the street. I was bought up in a terrace house ( thankfully demolished now ) and can tell you now it was very damp ( mouldy walls ) and cold - when it was frosty the ice was actualy on the inside of the sash windows. These houses would not be considered fit for habitation today and many of the terrace houses in Brierfield are similar even now, rented out by slum landlords their tennants trapped in fuel poverty . Anyone who feels that these gloomy buildings should be saved is welcome to invest their own money in them, as a taxpayer I begrudge paying for constant renovation projects ( elevate etc ) only to see them back in the same state ten years later. Time moves on - knock them down and use the land and stone to build decent modern homes. doomchanter
  • Score: 3

1:52pm Sun 23 Mar 14

HelmshoreMan2010 says...

I have lived in a terrace house and now live in a new build. The new build is half the square footage but feels so much bigger, it is also 3 - 4x cheaper to heat and light than my old terrace and just generally feels nicer.

What I will say is they should put aside some space in each development now for 1 bedroom properties. There are plenty of working people who live alone like me who don't need two bedrooms but there is also plenty of people on benefits who need smaller properties because of bedroom tax.
I have lived in a terrace house and now live in a new build. The new build is half the square footage but feels so much bigger, it is also 3 - 4x cheaper to heat and light than my old terrace and just generally feels nicer. What I will say is they should put aside some space in each development now for 1 bedroom properties. There are plenty of working people who live alone like me who don't need two bedrooms but there is also plenty of people on benefits who need smaller properties because of bedroom tax. HelmshoreMan2010
  • Score: 1

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