Phone scam warning from East Lancashire police

PEOPLE have been warned not to fall foul of a telephone marketing scam that could cost thousands.

Police said scammers leave a polite voice message on the voicemail asking people to call them back, sometimes saying a family member is ill, has died or been arrested.

The number is prefixed with 0809, 0284 or 0876 but Tony Ford, from Blackburn Police, warned: “These numbers are registered in the Dominican Republic and are charged at £1,500 per minute to you.

“Because you actually made the call, both your local phone company and your long-distance carrier will not want to get involved and will most likely tell you that they are simply providing the billing for the foreign company.

“You will end up dealing with a foreign company that argues they have done nothing wrong.”

Comments (7)

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7:45pm Thu 16 Jan 14

Legal Beagle says...

I can't believe that a policeman who is actually willing to put his name to this rubbish didn't carry out some simple checks before going to press.

This is an ancient urban myth dating back to 2000. There was originally a scam of this nature, but it only ever worked in the USA, as the numbers quoted refer to are the area codes for the Dominican Republic, British Virgin Islands and Jamaica AS DIALLED FROM THE USA.

There are NO numbers, premium rate or otherwise, that can be dialled from the UK beginning with any of those mentioned.

So might I suggest that next time our boys in blue are considering spreading these absurd stories and spreading alarm amongst the more gullible members of the community they first check by going to snopes.com or hoax-slayer.com:

http://www.snopes.co
m/fraud/telephone/80
9.asp
http://www.hoax-slay
er.com/area-code-809
-scam.html
I can't believe that a policeman who is actually willing to put his name to this rubbish didn't carry out some simple checks before going to press. This is an ancient urban myth dating back to 2000. There was originally a scam of this nature, but it only ever worked in the USA, as the numbers quoted refer to are the area codes for the Dominican Republic, British Virgin Islands and Jamaica AS DIALLED FROM THE USA. There are NO numbers, premium rate or otherwise, that can be dialled from the UK beginning with any of those mentioned. So might I suggest that next time our boys in blue are considering spreading these absurd stories and spreading alarm amongst the more gullible members of the community they first check by going to snopes.com or hoax-slayer.com: http://www.snopes.co m/fraud/telephone/80 9.asp http://www.hoax-slay er.com/area-code-809 -scam.html Legal Beagle

9:12am Fri 17 Jan 14

alphadelta says...

If you google "phone 0809" and look at "whocallsme", you'll see most of what Tony Ford said - word for word, and posted last October! And that's probably copied from somewhere else. Police should investigate, not simply copy what others have said.
If you google "phone 0809" and look at "whocallsme", you'll see most of what Tony Ford said - word for word, and posted last October! And that's probably copied from somewhere else. Police should investigate, not simply copy what others have said. alphadelta

6:35pm Fri 17 Jan 14

Shorty Medlocke says...

Hang your head in shame Tony Ford. You're not worth the money we pay you to serve us.
Hang your head in shame Tony Ford. You're not worth the money we pay you to serve us. Shorty Medlocke

6:42pm Fri 17 Jan 14

mastergx says...

alphadelta wrote:
If you google "phone 0809" and look at "whocallsme", you'll see most of what Tony Ford said - word for word, and posted last October! And that's probably copied from somewhere else. Police should investigate, not simply copy what others have said.
Since when have the Police been concerned with "investigating?"
[quote][p][bold]alphadelta[/bold] wrote: If you google "phone 0809" and look at "whocallsme", you'll see most of what Tony Ford said - word for word, and posted last October! And that's probably copied from somewhere else. Police should investigate, not simply copy what others have said.[/p][/quote]Since when have the Police been concerned with "investigating?" mastergx

12:18am Sun 9 Feb 14

Ian_SE says...

The scam first appeared in North America in the 1980s.

It involves three ordinary looking area codes (809, 284 and 876) that are treated as international calls when dialled from the US or Canada.

A valid telephone number in those three areas has another seven digits after the area code.

Dialling 0809 from the UK goes nowhere, irrespective of how many digits are dialled after that. The code is not in use.

Dialling 0284 from the UK will get you a Northern Ireland phone number, but only if you dial at least another seven digits.

Dialling 0876 from the UK goes nowhere, irrespective of how many digits are dialled after that. The code is not in use.

In order to dial a number in another country you have to dial 00 before the remote country code and area code.

The three places mentioned above come under the North American Number Plan and all three are area codes within the "1" country code.

From the UK you would have to dial 00 1 809 or 00 1 284 or 00 1 876 plus another seven digits in order to run up a huge bill.

In all, this is two more digits than any valid UK telephone number and so this would be very difficult to do by accident.

The fact that the dialled number begins 00 should be a big enough clue that it is an international call.
The scam first appeared in North America in the 1980s. It involves three ordinary looking area codes (809, 284 and 876) that are treated as international calls when dialled from the US or Canada. A valid telephone number in those three areas has another seven digits after the area code. Dialling 0809 from the UK goes nowhere, irrespective of how many digits are dialled after that. The code is not in use. Dialling 0284 from the UK will get you a Northern Ireland phone number, but only if you dial at least another seven digits. Dialling 0876 from the UK goes nowhere, irrespective of how many digits are dialled after that. The code is not in use. In order to dial a number in another country you have to dial 00 before the remote country code and area code. The three places mentioned above come under the North American Number Plan and all three are area codes within the "1" country code. From the UK you would have to dial 00 1 809 or 00 1 284 or 00 1 876 plus another seven digits in order to run up a huge bill. In all, this is two more digits than any valid UK telephone number and so this would be very difficult to do by accident. The fact that the dialled number begins 00 should be a big enough clue that it is an international call. Ian_SE

12:05am Thu 13 Feb 14

JonMAG says...

The police waste their time and ours on this... And the Telegraph report it... No one though to check that its a HOAX. Took me about ten seconds on Google: http://www.thatsnons
ense.com/view.php?id
=1816&keywords=0809%
20Area%20Code%20Scam
The police waste their time and ours on this... And the Telegraph report it... No one though to check that its a HOAX. Took me about ten seconds on Google: http://www.thatsnons ense.com/view.php?id =1816&keywords=0809% 20Area%20Code%20Scam JonMAG

12:57pm Thu 13 Feb 14

factchecking_lol says...

Standard of journalism extremely poor. No checking of facts before publishing, information taken on face value.

That isn't journalism, that's plagiarism.

Lancashire Telegraph, writer and editor, should hang your heads in shame.
Standard of journalism extremely poor. No checking of facts before publishing, information taken on face value. That isn't journalism, that's plagiarism. Lancashire Telegraph, writer and editor, should hang your heads in shame. factchecking_lol

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