Performance related pay unpopular with East Lancs teachers

Burnley and Pendle Citizen: Simon Jones Simon Jones

PERFORMANCE-related pay for teachers is proving unpopular, according to a union.

National Union of Teachers representatives for teachers in Lancashire and Blackburn with Darwen said members were unenthusiastic about a new system.

It comes amid claims the scheme could result in top teachers earning up to £70,000 a year, according a report the Policy Exchange.

The think tank said teachers would be able to earn up to £70,000 a year within an estimated five to eight years, compared with 12 years to reach a salary of £52,000.

The think tank also refer to a YouGov poll published in September which found 89 per cent of teachers want to be paid based on the quality of their teaching.

However Simon Jones, who is Lancashire’s NUT representative and Blackburn with Darwen secretary, said: “That is exactly what happens at present with teachers only moving up the pay scale if they have performed to the satisfaction of the school leadership. However, just two per cent of respondents in the same YouGov poll felt it ‘significantly more likely’ they would choose to work in a school where PRP was actually introduced.

“Measuring teachers' individual contributions is next to impossible. Teaching is based on teamwork and every teacher contributes in some way to a student’s development. Decisions will be unfair, subjective or even discriminatory.”

New powers for schools to reward teachers will see the first performance-linked pay increases made from September .

The NUT says it is currently trying to arrange talks with Education Secretary Michael Gove over pay and conditions.

If talks do not take place, a joint national strike will be called no later than February 13.

Comments (7)

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6:04pm Wed 8 Jan 14

pwitch says...

Will that also include the lecturers at universities who do about 9 hours a week when the students are told to do self-study themselves instead of attending lectures?
Will that also include the lecturers at universities who do about 9 hours a week when the students are told to do self-study themselves instead of attending lectures? pwitch

7:03pm Wed 8 Jan 14

Copperhead says...

Of course it's unpopular with teachers - it means they actually have to do some WORK instead of indoctrinating their pupils with left-wing propaganda and whingeing about the cuts in budgets.
Of course it's unpopular with teachers - it means they actually have to do some WORK instead of indoctrinating their pupils with left-wing propaganda and whingeing about the cuts in budgets. Copperhead

8:15pm Wed 8 Jan 14

2 for 5p ridesagain says...

Gravy train drying up is it lads. :-)
Gravy train drying up is it lads. :-) 2 for 5p ridesagain

8:22pm Wed 8 Jan 14

Gob says...

Copperhead wrote:
Of course it's unpopular with teachers - it means they actually have to do some WORK instead of indoctrinating their pupils with left-wing propaganda and whingeing about the cuts in budgets.
Head firmly up rectum.
[quote][p][bold]Copperhead[/bold] wrote: Of course it's unpopular with teachers - it means they actually have to do some WORK instead of indoctrinating their pupils with left-wing propaganda and whingeing about the cuts in budgets.[/p][/quote]Head firmly up rectum. Gob

11:49pm Wed 8 Jan 14

Graham Hartley says...

Ten years or so ago, 'merit' payments of £2000 to teachers were criticised but widely taken-up. There was much box-ticking conducted in schools, and money found its voice. That £2000 award attracted pay rises and the £2000 plus rises naturally became part of final salary in pension calculations. A few of those who understood that this was the back door to performance-related pay refused the payment - rather nobly, I consider.

www.theguardian.com/
uk/2002/aug/02/schoo
ls.education
Ten years or so ago, 'merit' payments of £2000 to teachers were criticised but widely taken-up. There was much box-ticking conducted in schools, and money found its voice. That £2000 award attracted pay rises and the £2000 plus rises naturally became part of final salary in pension calculations. A few of those who understood that this was the back door to performance-related pay refused the payment - rather nobly, I consider. www.theguardian.com/ uk/2002/aug/02/schoo ls.education Graham Hartley

1:22am Thu 9 Jan 14

pwitch says...

Some teachers do a very good job of course. But there are a lot who are useless I guess.
Some teachers do a very good job of course. But there are a lot who are useless I guess. pwitch

8:31am Thu 9 Jan 14

Excluded again says...

The problem with performance related pay for teachers is how to separate out performance. If Fred does well in his history exam is it because of his history teacher or because his English teacher has taught him to write better English, If Fiona does well in her maths exam in Year 11 is it because her year 11 teacher was really good or because her Year 9 teacher inspired her to perform better. You can't reward performance you can't measure easily.
The problem with performance related pay for teachers is how to separate out performance. If Fred does well in his history exam is it because of his history teacher or because his English teacher has taught him to write better English, If Fiona does well in her maths exam in Year 11 is it because her year 11 teacher was really good or because her Year 9 teacher inspired her to perform better. You can't reward performance you can't measure easily. Excluded again

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