Lancashire Constabulary Detectives sacked for car-buying scam

FOUR detectives from Lancashire Constabulary have been sacked for organising a car-buying scam.

The officers have been dismissed for gross misconduct after a misconduct hearing found them guilty of ordering unmarked cars for their covert police unit, knowing they would be able to buy them personally just months later at a heavily-reduced price.

In a bid to stop covert police cars being identified by criminals, they are changed frequently and sold to the public at heavily-reduced prices, with most aged only around six to 12 months.

The sacked officers, who include a detective chief inspector, all worked at police headquaters in Hutton. An investigation was launched after the scam was uncovered, and a fifth officer from the same department also faced the hearing, but the case against them was not proven.

A police spokesperson said: “These matters were brought to our attention in October last year and an investigation was immediately launched. The five officers were suspended from duty in March.

“The case was referred to the Independent Police Complaints Commission and a full and thorough investigation continued under their supervision, which resulted in the officers being charged with gross misconduct, as we were clear that in our view there was a case to answer.

“The misconduct hearing panel was made up of a chief officer and a chief superintendent from separate forces and a lay member.

“They have listened to the facts of the case over nine days and we welcome the decisions they have reached. The case was proven against four of the officers and a fifth was exonerated.

“Honesty and integrity are two of the most important characteristics of a police officer and these officers have clearly failed to display those qualities, as well as failing to act with due diligence. The impact of their actions has brought discredit to the force.

“We will ensure that any recommendations and lessons from this case are reflected on and we will work with the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner and the Police Federation to prevent further occurrences of this nature.

“We remain resolute in our commitment to deal with anyone in the organisation who does not keep to the high standards expected of them and which the vast majority of our staff adhere to on a daily basis.”

Lancashire’s Police and Crime Commissioner, Clive Grunshaw, said: “I support the actions of the Constabulary in this matter. I want everyone to have the highest level of confidence in the police and through their actions this minority have let the majority of dedicated and hard-working officers down."

Comments (23)

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12:52pm Tue 10 Dec 13

HarryBosch says...

Name them! What happened to open justic? If marine 'A' can be nnamed so can these.
Name them! What happened to open justic? If marine 'A' can be nnamed so can these. HarryBosch

1:39pm Tue 10 Dec 13

vicn1956 says...

Isn't clive value for money!!!!!!
Isn't clive value for money!!!!!! vicn1956

1:56pm Tue 10 Dec 13

Rich Riley says...

What are Mr Grunshaws views on the officer who was last evening seen by the whole region on BBC Northwest punching a non violent and non confrontational man whilst he was on the floor in Blackpool?
What are Mr Grunshaws views on the officer who was last evening seen by the whole region on BBC Northwest punching a non violent and non confrontational man whilst he was on the floor in Blackpool? Rich Riley

2:32pm Tue 10 Dec 13

shirtbox2003 says...

what have they done wrong?i would have thought this would just be a perk of the job,its not like the many fiddles going on further up the chain of command,lets hope these guys do some whistle blowing.
what have they done wrong?i would have thought this would just be a perk of the job,its not like the many fiddles going on further up the chain of command,lets hope these guys do some whistle blowing. shirtbox2003

4:13pm Tue 10 Dec 13

Izanears says...

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? i
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? i Izanears

6:18pm Tue 10 Dec 13

Legal Beagle says...

I quite agree that the officers concerned should be named - moreover, they should be prosecuted. Police officers are given lots of privileges over other employees, but in return they are supposed to operate to a high standard of integrity, and if they are dishonest they must be punished appropriately, if only pour encourager les autres.

And why on earth are apparently cash strapped police forces selling vehicles to the public "at heavily-reduced prices"? They should either follow the example of the prudent man in the street, and buy cars that are a few months old, thereby avoiding the initial depreciation, or they should link up with dealers and sell the cars at the best prices obtainable. This is yet another example of typical public sector thinking - it's only the taxpayers' money, why should we bother?
I quite agree that the officers concerned should be named - moreover, they should be prosecuted. Police officers are given lots of privileges over other employees, but in return they are supposed to operate to a high standard of integrity, and if they are dishonest they must be punished appropriately, if only pour encourager les autres. And why on earth are apparently cash strapped police forces selling vehicles to the public "at heavily-reduced prices"? They should either follow the example of the prudent man in the street, and buy cars that are a few months old, thereby avoiding the initial depreciation, or they should link up with dealers and sell the cars at the best prices obtainable. This is yet another example of typical public sector thinking - it's only the taxpayers' money, why should we bother? Legal Beagle

6:58pm Tue 10 Dec 13

denidenideni says...

They should become MP's, now they are experienced in scamming the public.
They should become MP's, now they are experienced in scamming the public. denidenideni

8:23pm Tue 10 Dec 13

ray_carlings_moustache says...

"Legal Beagle wrote:
I quite agree that the officers concerned should be named - moreover, they should be prosecuted. Police officers are given lots of privileges over other employees".
Whilst I don't disagree with the first sentence, I fail to understand the 'lots of privileges' comment. Do you mean the inability to comment freely on social media? Enjoy nights in certain pubs? Have certain friends you may have known since childhood and then be told they are not 'suitable as friends'? Not being able to do part time work if time allows unlike the Fire Service? Being told where in the County to work? Never being 'off duty' EVER? Legal Beagle, can we have some of the privileges listed that you have found for the police?
"Legal Beagle wrote: I quite agree that the officers concerned should be named - moreover, they should be prosecuted. Police officers are given lots of privileges over other employees". Whilst I don't disagree with the first sentence, I fail to understand the 'lots of privileges' comment. Do you mean the inability to comment freely on social media? Enjoy nights in certain pubs? Have certain friends you may have known since childhood and then be told they are not 'suitable as friends'? Not being able to do part time work if time allows unlike the Fire Service? Being told where in the County to work? Never being 'off duty' EVER? Legal Beagle, can we have some of the privileges listed that you have found for the police? ray_carlings_moustache

10:31pm Tue 10 Dec 13

full moon says...

This is a police headquarters and training facility!! The place should be an example of correct policing not a hotbed of corruption. There should be no opportunity of things like this arrising if senior officers were truly conducting their duties and not just paying lipservice.
This is a police headquarters and training facility!! The place should be an example of correct policing not a hotbed of corruption. There should be no opportunity of things like this arrising if senior officers were truly conducting their duties and not just paying lipservice. full moon

11:22pm Tue 10 Dec 13

You're not mugging me off that easily says...

Rich Riley wrote:
What are Mr Grunshaws views on the officer who was last evening seen by the whole region on BBC Northwest punching a non violent and non confrontational man whilst he was on the floor in Blackpool?
If he was asked for his views he'd probably claim expenses for it.
[quote][p][bold]Rich Riley[/bold] wrote: What are Mr Grunshaws views on the officer who was last evening seen by the whole region on BBC Northwest punching a non violent and non confrontational man whilst he was on the floor in Blackpool?[/p][/quote]If he was asked for his views he'd probably claim expenses for it. You're not mugging me off that easily

11:29pm Tue 10 Dec 13

You're not mugging me off that easily says...

full moon wrote:
This is a police headquarters and training facility!! The place should be an example of correct policing not a hotbed of corruption. There should be no opportunity of things like this arrising if senior officers were truly conducting their duties and not just paying lipservice.
One isolated incident doesn't qualify it to be branded a "hotbed of corruption".

I think you're getting a bit over excited there.
[quote][p][bold]full moon[/bold] wrote: This is a police headquarters and training facility!! The place should be an example of correct policing not a hotbed of corruption. There should be no opportunity of things like this arrising if senior officers were truly conducting their duties and not just paying lipservice.[/p][/quote]One isolated incident doesn't qualify it to be branded a "hotbed of corruption". I think you're getting a bit over excited there. You're not mugging me off that easily

11:39pm Tue 10 Dec 13

You're not mugging me off that easily says...

Legal Beagle wrote:
I quite agree that the officers concerned should be named - moreover, they should be prosecuted. Police officers are given lots of privileges over other employees, but in return they are supposed to operate to a high standard of integrity, and if they are dishonest they must be punished appropriately, if only pour encourager les autres.

And why on earth are apparently cash strapped police forces selling vehicles to the public "at heavily-reduced prices"? They should either follow the example of the prudent man in the street, and buy cars that are a few months old, thereby avoiding the initial depreciation, or they should link up with dealers and sell the cars at the best prices obtainable. This is yet another example of typical public sector thinking - it's only the taxpayers' money, why should we bother?
What privileges are these then LB ?
[quote][p][bold]Legal Beagle[/bold] wrote: I quite agree that the officers concerned should be named - moreover, they should be prosecuted. Police officers are given lots of privileges over other employees, but in return they are supposed to operate to a high standard of integrity, and if they are dishonest they must be punished appropriately, if only pour encourager les autres. And why on earth are apparently cash strapped police forces selling vehicles to the public "at heavily-reduced prices"? They should either follow the example of the prudent man in the street, and buy cars that are a few months old, thereby avoiding the initial depreciation, or they should link up with dealers and sell the cars at the best prices obtainable. This is yet another example of typical public sector thinking - it's only the taxpayers' money, why should we bother?[/p][/quote]What privileges are these then LB ? You're not mugging me off that easily

4:44pm Wed 11 Dec 13

roversok says...

What privileges are these then LB ?
Overtime for fun
Early retirement
Paid up early with full pension
Bupa
Annual pay rises
Cheap cars
They are In their own little world
What privileges are these then LB ? Overtime for fun Early retirement Paid up early with full pension Bupa Annual pay rises Cheap cars They are In their own little world roversok

5:05pm Wed 11 Dec 13

M Foster says...

Comments gone missing. Censorship alive and kicking at LT.
To my detractor - If my contact's assersions about police corruption are right and he does find a horse's head in his bed - case proven!
Comments gone missing. Censorship alive and kicking at LT. To my detractor - If my contact's assersions about police corruption are right and he does find a horse's head in his bed - case proven! M Foster

5:37pm Wed 11 Dec 13

glossopkid says...

Legal Beagle wrote:
I quite agree that the officers concerned should be named - moreover, they should be prosecuted. Police officers are given lots of privileges over other employees, but in return they are supposed to operate to a high standard of integrity, and if they are dishonest they must be punished appropriately, if only pour encourager les autres.

And why on earth are apparently cash strapped police forces selling vehicles to the public "at heavily-reduced prices"? They should either follow the example of the prudent man in the street, and buy cars that are a few months old, thereby avoiding the initial depreciation, or they should link up with dealers and sell the cars at the best prices obtainable. This is yet another example of typical public sector thinking - it's only the taxpayers' money, why should we bother?
QUITE AGREE WITH YOU MATE, BUT NOT SO SURE IF MUGGINS WILL AGREE, AS HE LIKES TO COVER HIS PALS MISTAKES.
[quote][p][bold]Legal Beagle[/bold] wrote: I quite agree that the officers concerned should be named - moreover, they should be prosecuted. Police officers are given lots of privileges over other employees, but in return they are supposed to operate to a high standard of integrity, and if they are dishonest they must be punished appropriately, if only pour encourager les autres. And why on earth are apparently cash strapped police forces selling vehicles to the public "at heavily-reduced prices"? They should either follow the example of the prudent man in the street, and buy cars that are a few months old, thereby avoiding the initial depreciation, or they should link up with dealers and sell the cars at the best prices obtainable. This is yet another example of typical public sector thinking - it's only the taxpayers' money, why should we bother?[/p][/quote]QUITE AGREE WITH YOU MATE, BUT NOT SO SURE IF MUGGINS WILL AGREE, AS HE LIKES TO COVER HIS PALS MISTAKES. glossopkid

5:39pm Wed 11 Dec 13

killycourt says...

This is not the end of this case. The appeal process will drag on. There is a lot more to this than meets the eye. This is not corruption, and if my sources are correct the officers asked for permission prior to their actions. This practice has gone on for years and years, so why all of a sudden target these three officers.
Watch this space. The headlines in a few month will reverberate around the County.
This is not the end of this case. The appeal process will drag on. There is a lot more to this than meets the eye. This is not corruption, and if my sources are correct the officers asked for permission prior to their actions. This practice has gone on for years and years, so why all of a sudden target these three officers. Watch this space. The headlines in a few month will reverberate around the County. killycourt

11:28pm Wed 11 Dec 13

You're not mugging me off that easily says...

roversok wrote:
What privileges are these then LB ?
Overtime for fun
Early retirement
Paid up early with full pension
Bupa
Annual pay rises
Cheap cars
They are In their own little world
What an utter cretin. You are clearly another thicko that's been brainwashed by the daily Mail.

Several relatives in the cops pal so let me respond to your spurious information.

Overtime for fun - with £73 million in savings to find? No chance
Early retirement - the Winsor/Hutton reports have seen to it that most cops will have to work an EXTRA 5 years at least before drawing a reduced pension.
Annual pay rises - they haven't had one for 3 years and any subsequent ones will be capped at 1%.
Bupa - are you having a f**king laugh?

So you see everything you just said there is complete b0llocks. Get your facts straight in future before you make yourself look stupid, as you have on this occasion.
[quote][p][bold]roversok[/bold] wrote: What privileges are these then LB ? Overtime for fun Early retirement Paid up early with full pension Bupa Annual pay rises Cheap cars They are In their own little world[/p][/quote]What an utter cretin. You are clearly another thicko that's been brainwashed by the daily Mail. Several relatives in the cops pal so let me respond to your spurious information. Overtime for fun - with £73 million in savings to find? No chance Early retirement - the Winsor/Hutton reports have seen to it that most cops will have to work an EXTRA 5 years at least before drawing a reduced pension. Annual pay rises - they haven't had one for 3 years and any subsequent ones will be capped at 1%. Bupa - are you having a f**king laugh? So you see everything you just said there is complete b0llocks. Get your facts straight in future before you make yourself look stupid, as you have on this occasion. You're not mugging me off that easily

11:32pm Wed 11 Dec 13

You're not mugging me off that easily says...

glossopkid wrote:
Legal Beagle wrote:
I quite agree that the officers concerned should be named - moreover, they should be prosecuted. Police officers are given lots of privileges over other employees, but in return they are supposed to operate to a high standard of integrity, and if they are dishonest they must be punished appropriately, if only pour encourager les autres.

And why on earth are apparently cash strapped police forces selling vehicles to the public "at heavily-reduced prices"? They should either follow the example of the prudent man in the street, and buy cars that are a few months old, thereby avoiding the initial depreciation, or they should link up with dealers and sell the cars at the best prices obtainable. This is yet another example of typical public sector thinking - it's only the taxpayers' money, why should we bother?
QUITE AGREE WITH YOU MATE, BUT NOT SO SURE IF MUGGINS WILL AGREE, AS HE LIKES TO COVER HIS PALS MISTAKES.
You'll hear no argument from me. They should be named, they are a disgrace to the badge.

YOU DONT HAVE TO SHOUT THOUGH !!!

And there's no need to besmirch my good name G kid.
[quote][p][bold]glossopkid[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Legal Beagle[/bold] wrote: I quite agree that the officers concerned should be named - moreover, they should be prosecuted. Police officers are given lots of privileges over other employees, but in return they are supposed to operate to a high standard of integrity, and if they are dishonest they must be punished appropriately, if only pour encourager les autres. And why on earth are apparently cash strapped police forces selling vehicles to the public "at heavily-reduced prices"? They should either follow the example of the prudent man in the street, and buy cars that are a few months old, thereby avoiding the initial depreciation, or they should link up with dealers and sell the cars at the best prices obtainable. This is yet another example of typical public sector thinking - it's only the taxpayers' money, why should we bother?[/p][/quote]QUITE AGREE WITH YOU MATE, BUT NOT SO SURE IF MUGGINS WILL AGREE, AS HE LIKES TO COVER HIS PALS MISTAKES.[/p][/quote]You'll hear no argument from me. They should be named, they are a disgrace to the badge. YOU DONT HAVE TO SHOUT THOUGH !!! And there's no need to besmirch my good name G kid. You're not mugging me off that easily

11:36pm Wed 11 Dec 13

You're not mugging me off that easily says...

roversok wrote:
What privileges are these then LB ?
Overtime for fun
Early retirement
Paid up early with full pension
Bupa
Annual pay rises
Cheap cars
They are In their own little world
And the odd full stop and comma might make you look a bit more intelligent.
[quote][p][bold]roversok[/bold] wrote: What privileges are these then LB ? Overtime for fun Early retirement Paid up early with full pension Bupa Annual pay rises Cheap cars They are In their own little world[/p][/quote]And the odd full stop and comma might make you look a bit more intelligent. You're not mugging me off that easily

11:40pm Wed 11 Dec 13

Pyewacket2 says...

Just a question, that if they intend to only keep these undercover cars for a few weeks or months at a time, why are they buying brand new ones, with easily identifiable local registration P plates. Wouldn't it be better to source these vehicles at the Auctions, and save a hell of a lot of money ?
Just a question, that if they intend to only keep these undercover cars for a few weeks or months at a time, why are they buying brand new ones, with easily identifiable local registration P plates. Wouldn't it be better to source these vehicles at the Auctions, and save a hell of a lot of money ? Pyewacket2

7:44am Thu 12 Dec 13

You're not mugging me off that easily says...

Pyewacket2 wrote:
Just a question, that if they intend to only keep these undercover cars for a few weeks or months at a time, why are they buying brand new ones, with easily identifiable local registration P plates. Wouldn't it be better to source these vehicles at the Auctions, and save a hell of a lot of money ?
How could they be sure that one of the bad guys they were following/subject to the operation didn't used to own it, or one of his/hers friends or family?

Unlikely I know but not impossible. Buying new means it has no history and therefore no chance of being compromised.

Does seem a bit expensive but it's not shoplifters they are dealing with here it's really nasty organised crime groups who are active in serious criminal activities.
[quote][p][bold]Pyewacket2[/bold] wrote: Just a question, that if they intend to only keep these undercover cars for a few weeks or months at a time, why are they buying brand new ones, with easily identifiable local registration P plates. Wouldn't it be better to source these vehicles at the Auctions, and save a hell of a lot of money ?[/p][/quote]How could they be sure that one of the bad guys they were following/subject to the operation didn't used to own it, or one of his/hers friends or family? Unlikely I know but not impossible. Buying new means it has no history and therefore no chance of being compromised. Does seem a bit expensive but it's not shoplifters they are dealing with here it's really nasty organised crime groups who are active in serious criminal activities. You're not mugging me off that easily

9:12am Fri 13 Dec 13

tibbsy says...

de commissioned Police vehicles are sold off at public car auctions.If these officers bought them direct from the police or had them doctored prior to being offered at auction to reduce the selling price,I magine these could be criminal offences.
de commissioned Police vehicles are sold off at public car auctions.If these officers bought them direct from the police or had them doctored prior to being offered at auction to reduce the selling price,I magine these could be criminal offences. tibbsy

4:57pm Wed 1 Jan 14

Linda1963 says...

HarryBosch wrote:
Name them! What happened to open justic? If marine 'A' can be nnamed so can these.
I bet I name them. the same corrupt officers for years
[quote][p][bold]HarryBosch[/bold] wrote: Name them! What happened to open justic? If marine 'A' can be nnamed so can these.[/p][/quote]I bet I name them. the same corrupt officers for years Linda1963

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